The Difference Between Cellulose and Asbestos Insulation 2022

Asbestos In The News 2021

With asbestos still being used as a very commonly used fire retardant and a very popular insulator right until the end of the 1980’s. It was very versatile, affordable and it could be used in tiles and blow it with another material, vermiculite.

Differences Between Asbestos And Cellulose Insulation

Before we review the differences between asbestos and cellulose insulation, it is worth comprehending the properties regarding each of these materials.

Asbestos Insulation

Many people do not know that asbestos is, in fact, a natural mineral. asbestos is in general terms flexible and soft but also has great corrosion resistant and heat resistant properties. From the early 1950’s for a period of nearly forty years, the construction industry used asbestos as an insulator and fire retardant. When you view older buildings and houses, you will still find asbestos in drywall, tiles, tile grout and in the attic. That being said, so long as there are no damage or wall cavities exposing asbestos fibers in the living areas of the property, it is deemed to be safe. However, it becomes a very serious health hazard when asbestos particles become airborne and are able to reach the areas of the proeprty you occupy.

Cellulose Insulation

As an asbestos alternative, cellulose insulation is made from many different materials including cardboard, hemp, straw, newspaper, and many other different materials. When a paper-based cellulose mix is utilized by builders, it is treated with something called boric acid to give it fire resistance properties.

The two most common forms of cellulose insulation include dry cellulose and that is also known as loose-fill insulation. Builders will use a blower to blow the cellulose into the wall through holes. it can also be used to fill wall cavities. Wet spray cellulose is something builders use to apply to walls that have been newly constructed. The primary difference between dry cellulose and wet spray is that water is added during the sprying process. it provides a better seal for the prevention of heat loss.

Like asbestos, cellulose works well within pipes, walls and around wiring. it assists in both suppressing fires and both insulating your home. Cellulose also utilizes material that is recycled and that is a big advantage for owners of buildings looking to go green.

Differences

So now you understand the differences in the ingredients, they do look very similar when they are inspected. Although it is a different insulator, there are similar issues with vermiculite attic insulation as it is a very difficult proposition to see whether asbestos is contained within. The best thing to do is not to touch it but obtain the services of a professional to extract some samples and get a confirmation as to whether it contains asbestos. If asbestos is contained, you will want to seriously consider instituting a program of asbestos management or to completely remove the asbestos.

What To Do Next

When more than ten square feet of asbestos, you need the services of a professional abatement company. When you are handling larger projects, there is an extremely high risk of exposure and contamination not only to you but also those around you.

The professional contractor will quickly and safely remove the asbestos and with the set-up of barriers surrounding the work area to prevent tenants from coming into contact with asbestos. Reverse airflow will be used to keep the asbestos fibers from spreading. They will then wear equipment with special protective qualities and cleanse the area with HEPA filter vacuums and then properly dispose of the asbestos.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

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Does Asbestos Causes Cancer

How Asbestos Causes Cancer

The following article is a fully sourced academic report from the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

Summary

More than 20 million people in the U.S., and many more worldwide, who have been exposed to asbestos are at risk of developing mesothelioma, a malignant cancer of the membranes that cover the lungs and abdomen that is resistant to current therapies. Moreover, asbestos exposure increases the risk of lung cancer among smokers. For the past 40 years researchers have tried to understand why asbestos causes cancer.

The answer appears in a study published in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A., Drs. Haining Yang and Michele Carbone at the University of Hawai’i Cancer Research Center led a research team that included collaborators at New York University, University of Chicago, University of Pittsburgh, San Raffaele University of Milano, and the Imperial College in London.

These researchers addressed the paradox of how asbestos fibers that kill cells could cause cancer, since a dead cell should not be able to grow and form a tumor. They found that when asbestos kills cells, it does so by inducing a process called “programmed cell necrosis” that leads to the release of a molecule called high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1). HMGB1 starts a particular type of inflammatory reaction that causes the release of mutagens and factors that promote tumor growth. The researchers found that patients exposed to asbestos have elevated levels of HMGB1 in their serum. Therefore, they state that it may be possible to target HMGB1 to prevent or treat mesothelioma and identify asbestos-exposed cohorts by simple HMGB1 serological testing.

In the article, the researchers propose that by interfering with the inflammatory reaction caused by asbestos and HMGB1, it may be possible to decrease cancer incidence among cohorts exposed to asbestos and decrease the rate of tumor growth among those already affected by mesothelioma. Drs. Yang and Carbone, the lead authors, state that to test this hypothesis, they are now planning a clinical trial in a remote area in Cappadocia, Turkey, where over 50% of the population dies of malignant mesothelioma. If the results are positive, the approach will be extended to cohorts of asbestos-exposed individuals in the U.S.

This research emphasizes the role of inflammation in causing different types of cancers and provides novel clinical tools to identify exposed individuals and prevent or decrease tumor growth. The researchers question if it will be possible to prevent mesothelioma, like colon cancer, simply by taking aspirin or similar drugs that stop inflammation. They are about to test this hypothesis.

The article is authored by Haining Yang, Zeyana Rivera, Sandro Jube, Masaki Nasu, Pietro Bertino and Michele Carbone at the University of Hawai’i Cancer Research Center; Harvey I. Pass and Chandra Goparaju at New York University; Thomas Krausz at the University of Chicago; Michael T. Lotze at the University of Pittsburgh; Guido Franzoso at the Imperial College of London, U.K.; and Marco E. Bianchi at the University of San Raffele Milano, Italy. It will be published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A. the week of June 28 2010, and later in print. The study was supported by grants from the U.S. National Cancer Institute, and by the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation.

Source: University of Hawaii at Manoa. “Mystery unraveled: How asbestos causes cancer.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100629094153.htm>.


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Hawaii at ManoaNote: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Haining Yang, Zeyana Rivera, Sandro Jube, Masaki Nasu, Pietro Bertino, Chandra Goparaju, Guido Franzoso, Michael T. Lotze, Thomas Krausz, Harvey I. Pass, Marco E. Bianchi, and Michele Carbone. Programmed necrosis induced by asbestos in human mesothelial cells causes high-mobility group box 1 protein release and resultant inflammationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2010; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1006542107

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Removing Asbestos

How To Test For Asbestos In Popcorn Ceilings

Asbestos Insulation Removal

Asbestos removal may become an issue when a material containing asbestos is damaged, crumbling or flaking in your home. Read on to learn more about what to do and the costs associated with the removal of asbestos.

Asbestos was used very widely in building materials before the start of the 1970’s. In reality it is actually a carcinogen but can often be found in older buildings among pipe and duct ventilation, vermiculite attic insulation, wall and ceiling acoustic tiles, cement floor tiles and siding as well as floor tile adhesives.

However it is wise that is the asbestos containing materials are in your home are undamaged, leave them alone. According to the Environmental Protection Agency it is far more dangerous to disturb them. In fact in the majority of states you must disclose if asbestos is in your home prior to its sale. But if you are planning a remodel, removing the asbestos will be the best thing you can do if you are going to disturb it in any way.

Asbestos Removal Basics

The first thing to do is to have the material you suspect containing asbestos tested and then have it professionally removed.

  • Speak with the asbestos program in your region as well as the asbestos administrative department in the state where the property is or you can contact OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) regional office to establish the local regulations and requirements for your area.
  • Find accreited asbestos contractors and inspectors who are trained and licenced in the testing and removal of safe asbestos.
  • Conflict of interest can be avoided by having suspect materials tested by a certain company and the removal completed by a different company.
  • Preparation is key. It may be the case you and your family will have to move out of your house on a temporary basis while the asbestos is being removed from the property.

Getting A Contractor

There is nothing infra dig about using a flooring, siding or roofing contractor for this as long as they are trained and well practices in the removal of asbestos. Before the commencement of work, you will want to ensure you have a written contract clearly expressing the local, state and federal regulations the contractor is obliged to follow including the clean up of your premises and the disposal of the asbestos. At the end of the job, get written evidence from the contractor that the above procedures were completed correctly. Have a licensed asbestos inspector perform a follow-up check as a final step.

Asbestos Removal Costs

An initial inspecton for asbestos costs an average of $600 with prices ranging from $400 to $800 for the US in 2019.

Asbestos removal costs do vary depending on how much needs to be removed. But you can expect an average minimum fee of $2,250 with averages varying on the low to high end at between $1,500 and $3,000.

Total asbestos removal in a home measuring 1,500 square feet with asbestos in the floors, walls, ceilings, pipes and roof averages $25,000 with costs ranging from $20,000 to $30,000 for the US in 2019.

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

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Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

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Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos And Housing

Asbestos In Houses

Window and door seals

Asbestos can be found in caulk or sealant products which are placed on windows and doors. The material’s heat resistance is suitable to keeping temperate air from passing through the sealant. Caulk with asbestos was also once used to increase the efficiency of gasket seals found in furnace doors. Apart from high heat resistance, the caulk is also able to create a tight pressure seal.

Property insulation

Asbestos is mostly used as an insulating material in homes built before the 90s. The material can keep the heat from escaping the house. It is also able to efficiently block a lot of noise. Asbestos insulation is often placed between walls and in ceilings.

Concrete or wood adhesion

Before the 1980s, asbestos was used in many adhesion products to secure wooden or concrete materials in place. This is due to the tensile strength of the asbestos fibres, which ensures anything attached to it is secure. This type of adhesion can be found in floors, walls and ceilings.

Vintage furniture

Asbestos was often used in furniture between the 1930s and ‘60s. The material was used in chairs to provide a cushioning support. Couches with springs installed inside them may have asbestos within the underside. Furniture with this hazardous material weaved into it are often dyed in gold or silver. Asbestos stuffing and woven fabrics have a fibrous quality when seen up close.

Source: https://www.asbestosremovalsaustralia.com.au/blog/common-place-asbestos/

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Why Is Asbestos Dangerous?

Why Is Asbestos Dangerous

Asbestos fibers  most often enter the body is through breathing . Several of the fibers become trapped in the mucous membranes of the throat and nose where they can then be removed, but some can get into the lungs, or, if swallowed, into the digestive tract. Asbestos is most hazardous when it is friable, meaning it is easily crumbled by hand, releasing fibers into the air. Sprayed on asbestos insulation is highly friable.  Asbestos-containing ceiling tiles, floor tiles, undamaged laboratory cabinet tops, shingles, fire doors, siding shingles, etc. will not release asbestos fibers unless they are disturbed or damaged in some way.

Asbestosis

Asbestosis is a serious, chronic, non-cancerous respiratory disease. Inhaled asbestos fibers aggravate lung tissues, which cause them to scar. Symptoms of asbestosis include shortness of breath and a dry crackling sound in the lungs while inhaling.  There is no effective treatment for asbestosis; the disease is usually disabling or fatal. Those who renovate or demolish buildings that contain asbestos may be at significant risk, depending on the nature of the exposure and precautions taken.

Lung Cancer

Lung cancer causes the largest number of deaths related to asbestos exposure. The incidence of lung cancer in people who are directly involved in the mining, milling, manufacturing and use of asbestos and its products is much higher than in the general population.  People who have been exposed to asbestos and are also exposed to some other carcinogen — such as cigarette smoke — have a significantly greater risk of developing lung cancer than people who have only been exposed to asbestos.

Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer that most often occurs in the thin membrane lining of the lungs, chest, abdomen, and (rarely) heart. About 200 cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. Virtually all cases of mesothelioma are linked with asbestos exposure. Approximately 2 percent of all miners and textile workers who work with asbestos, and 10 percent of all workers who were involved in the manufacture of asbestos-containing gas masks, contract mesothelioma. People who work in asbestos mines, asbestos mills and factories, and shipyards that use asbestos, as well as people who manufacture and install asbestos insulation, have an increased risk of mesothelioma. So do people who live with asbestos workers, near asbestos mining areas, near asbestos product factories or near shipyards where use of asbestos has produced large quantities of airborne asbestos fibers.

Source: https://ehs.oregonstate.edu/asb-when

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos At Clean Up Sites

Asbestos At Clean Up Sites

This is a link to the latest EPA Guidelines for the Current Best Practices for Asbestos At Clean Up Sites,

In this rare case, we are just going to link directly to the government website as the article is fully referenced with additional resources. It may be read here:

https://www.epa.gov/asbestos/current-best-practices-preventing-asbestos-exposure-among-brake-and-clutch-repair-0

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Current Best Practices For Brake and Clutch Repair Workers

Current Best Practices For Brake and Clutch Repair Workers

This is a link to the latest EPA Guidelines for the Current Best Practices for Preventing Asbestos Exposure Among Brake and Clutch Repair Workers.

In this rare case, we are just going to link directly to the government website as the article is fully referenced with additional resources. It may be read here:

https://www.epa.gov/asbestos/current-best-practices-preventing-asbestos-exposure-among-brake-and-clutch-repair-0

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Is Asbestos Still Used In Brake Pads?

Is Asbestos Still Used In Brake Pads

Asbestos is well known as a human carcinogen yet there are still materials containing asbestos in the USA and one of those products is often brake pads. read on to learn more.

Aftermarket Brakes

The majority of auto manufacturers haven’t installed asbestos-containing brake pads since the 1990’s due to health concerns for those that perform brake-related automotive repair or maintenance. And yet, asbestos-containing products are still used in the automotive aftermarket industry in the US, primarily due to high sales of low-cost, asbestos-containing brake parts from countries such as China and India.

Legal Proceedings

In 1989, the EPA proposed a ban on the manufacture, import, processing, and sale of asbestos-containing products to be phased out over seven years. But asbestos industry supporters challenged the ban. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the first stage of the EPA ban — prohibits new uses of asbestos, banned imported asbestos products, and ended the asbestos use in roofing and flooring felt, sheeting and tile, and clothing but id did not include several automotive parts in the ruling including brake pads.

Several initiatives have taken hold in some states such as California and Washington limiting the sale of brake pads containing asbestos. These initiatives have implications for the automotive brake parts aftermarket in North America, restraining future sales of low-cost imports from China and India, which are more likely to contain asbestos.  Replacement brake part sales in the US and Canada will see a shift in the product mix toward alternatives such as NAO brake pads and high-value, durable ceramic brake pads.

Source: https://www.freedoniagroup.com/Content/Blog/2017/05/22/Asbestos-in-Brake-Pads-What-the-Average-Consumer-Might-Not-Realize

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Defining Asbestosis

Defining Asbestosis

Here is the Mayo Clinic’s definition of asbestosis:

Asbestosis (as-bes-TOE-sis) is a chronic lung disease caused by inhaling asbestos fibers. Prolonged exposure to these fibers can cause lung tissue scarring and shortness of breath. Asbestosis symptoms can range from mild to severe, and usually don’t appear until many years after continued exposure.

Asbestos is a natural mineral product that’s resistant to heat and corrosion. It was used extensively in the past in products such as insulation, cement and some floor tiles.

Most people with asbestosis acquired it on the job before the federal government began regulating the use of asbestos and asbestos products in the 1970s. Today, its handling is strictly regulated. Acquiring asbestosis is extremely unlikely if you follow your employer’s safety procedures. Treatment focuses on relieving your symptoms.

The effects of long-term exposure to asbestos typically don’t show up until 10 to 40 years after initial exposure. Symptoms can vary in severity. Asbestosis signs and symptoms may include:

  • Shortness of breath
  • A persistent, dry cough
  • Loss of appetite with weight loss
  • Fingertips and toes that appear wider and rounder than normal (clubbing)
  • Chest tightness or pain

If you have a history of exposure to asbestos and you’re experiencing increasing shortness of breath, talk to your doctor about the possibility of asbestosis.

Causes

If you are exposed to high levels of asbestos dust over a long period of time, some of the airborne fibers can become lodged within your alveoli — the tiny sacs inside your lungs where oxygen is exchanged for carbon dioxide in your blood. The asbestos fibers irritate and scar lung tissue, causing the lungs to become stiff. This makes it difficult to breathe.

As asbestosis progresses, more and more lung tissue becomes scarred. Eventually, your lung tissue becomes so stiff that it can’t contract and expand normally.

Smoking appears to increase the retention of asbestos fibers in the lungs, and often results in a faster progression of the disease.

Risk factors

People who worked in mining, milling, manufacturing, installation or removal of asbestos products before the late 1970s are at risk of asbestosis. Examples include:

  • Asbestos miners
  • Aircraft and auto mechanics
  • Boiler operators
  • Building construction workers
  • Electricians
  • Railroad workers
  • Refinery and mill workers
  • Shipyard workers
  • Workers removing asbestos insulation around steam pipes in older buildings

Risk of asbestosis is generally related to the amount and the duration of exposure to asbestos. The greater the exposure is, the greater the risk is of lung damage.

Secondhand exposure is possible for household members of exposed workers, as asbestos fibers may be carried home on clothing. People living close to mines may also be exposed to asbestos fibers released into the air.

In general, it’s safe to be around materials that are made with asbestos as long as the asbestos fibers are contained. This prevents them from getting into the air and being inhaled.

Complications

If you have asbestosis, you’re at increased risk of developing lung cancer — especially if you smoke or have a history of smoking. Rarely, malignant mesothelioma, a cancer of the tissue around the lung, can occur many years after exposure to asbestos.

Prevention

Reducing exposure to asbestos is the best prevention against asbestosis. In the United States, federal law requires employers in industries that work with asbestos products — such as construction — to take special safety measures.

Many homes, schools and other buildings built before the 1970s have materials such as pipes and floor tiles that contain asbestos. Generally, there’s no risk of exposure as long as the asbestos is enclosed and undisturbed. It’s when materials containing asbestos are damaged that there’s a danger of asbestos fibers being released into the air and inhaled.

Source: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/asbestosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20354637

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Houses

Asbestos In Houses

Window and door seals

Asbestos can be found in caulk or sealant products which are placed on windows and doors. The material’s heat resistance is suitable to keeping temperate air from passing through the sealant. Caulk with asbestos was also once used to increase the efficiency of gasket seals found in furnace doors. Apart from high heat resistance, the caulk is also able to create a tight pressure seal.

Property insulation

Asbestos is mostly used as an insulating material in homes built before the 90s. The material can keep the heat from escaping the house. It is also able to efficiently block a lot of noise. Asbestos insulation is often placed between walls and in ceilings.

Concrete or wood adhesion

Before the 1980s, asbestos was used in many adhesion products to secure wooden or concrete materials in place. This is due to the tensile strength of the asbestos fibres, which ensures anything attached to it is secure. This type of adhesion can be found in floors, walls and ceilings.

Vintage furniture

Asbestos was often used in furniture between the 1930s and ‘60s. The material was used in chairs to provide a cushioning support. Couches with springs installed inside them may have asbestos within the underside. Furniture with this hazardous material weaved into it are often dyed in gold or silver. Asbestos stuffing and woven fabrics have a fibrous quality when seen up close.

Source: https://www.asbestosremovalsaustralia.com.au/blog/common-place-asbestos/

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Areas You Can Often Find Asbestos

Asbestos In Houses

Asbestos can be found in many unexpected places. Here are ten spots where asbestos may be found where you may not realize it. read on to learn more.

Seals And Sealants

Asbestos was often used in caulking in windows and doors until the 1970’s. It was also used on furnace doors, gasket seals, old coal chutes and other heat resistant areas.

Bowling Balls

Bowling balls can last for decades. And while most modern bowling balls are not made with asbestos, that perfect nine-pound, magenta bowling ball you chose at the bowling alley may actually be an older, asbestos-filled one.

Siding And Roofing

Most cement or asphalt composites used in roofing and siding are generally considered nonfriable, but those with a large paper make up are friable because they come apart with pressure. Both types release breathable particles of asbestos when cutting into or removed by tearing and pose a health hazard.

Talcum Powder

This seemingly harmless substance is raising red flags because of a dangerous risk of asbestos exposure. The connection between talc and asbestos involves the close proximity of the two minerals on the earth’s surface, which often results in contamination.

Ducts And Pipes

Old systems of steam piping and even some hot water plumbing are wrapped in asbestos-containing “blankets” that pose a serious risk when removed or cut without the help of a professional who uses protective measures to dampen the release of particles.

Crayons

Through independent tests, asbestos fibers were found in four of the 28 boxes of crayons tested, and two of the 21 crime-scene fingerprint kits.

Books And Bindings

“Fahrenheit 451” has a notorious past for being bound with asbestos in hopes the book would never be burned.  It is not the first time book bindings contained asbestos. In fact, reports show bookbinders were exposed to asbestos in the mid-1900’s.

Ceiling Tiles

Obvious forms of asbestos ceiling tiles are the 9 by 9 inch (22.86 by 22.86 cm) or 12 by 12 inches (30.48 by 30.48 cm) white or off-white panels held up in a grid system. Adding or removing a tile involves pushing it up from the grid frame and angling it down and out or up and in place. Basements in homes, in particular, might feature the tiles because of their soundproof qualities and low cost. It’s estimated that 5 to 10 percent of the ceiling tiles in the U.S. contain asbestos.

Wallpaper

Removing layers of old paper that have hung in there, adhering to walls for decades, is a remodeling project of major proportions. It involves lots of time and elbow grease. In homes papered before 1980, it can even be downright dangerous to undertake wallpaper removal because many vinyl papers before that time contain asbestos

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In The News April 2022

On April 19, 2022, Asbestos.com reported: (the full article can be read here.)

Johnson & Johnson Bankruptcy Plan Won’t Halt Industrial Talc Lawsuit

Johnson & Johnson may have used a controversial bankruptcy spinoff to avoid almost 40,000 cosmetic talc lawsuits, but it now must face plaintiffs harmed by industrial talcum powder decades ago.

U.S. federal Judge Michael Kaplan ruled earlier this month that the recent bankruptcy plan halting the majority of cases would not apply to this latest class-action lawsuit.

The ruling in a New Jersey Superior Court stems from a complaint first brought in 1986. A man claimed his lung disease was caused by asbestos exposure linked to contaminated talc at his job at Windsor Minerals, a mine in Vermont owned by Johnson & Johnson.

J&J sold the mine in 1989. The man died in 1994, but his family has reopened the case. They claim new evidence has shown the company was withholding test results and falsifying records, which led to the case being dropped.

Through the 1980s, more than a thousand others filed lawsuits against J&J that met similar ends. The recent ruling is expected to gather many of them in a class-action suit.

Ruling Reopens Talc Legal Claims

Kaplan, who approved J&J’s Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing in February, ruled that the proposed lawsuit was different enough from the cosmetic talc cases that it can move forward.

J&J has long maintained that the talc in its products, both cosmetic and industrial, is free from asbestos, a toxic mineral that can cause serious illnesses, including mesothelioma and ovarian cancers.

Most everyone agrees that talc, one of the world’s softest minerals, is safe by itself but it often is mined near asbestos and can become contaminated.

“We stand by the safety of the talc sold by Windsor Minerals, which was once a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary,” the company said in an emailed statement. “Johnson & Johnson denies the claims being brought forth in this suit, and will defend the case if it proceeds.”

Product testing, which varies widely, has been inconclusive through the years. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration performed a review of cosmetic talc products in 2020 and found traces of asbestos in nine of 52 products.

Separating Cosmetic and Industrial Talc Lawsuits

In recent years, Johnson & Johnson, which is one of America’s richest companies, has both won and lost legal cases brought against it involving asbestos-contaminated talc.

The majority of talc cases involve women and cosmetic powders, including the iconic Johnson’s Baby Powder. The use of talc in the baby powder was discontinued in the U.S. and Canada in 2020.

Settlements and verdicts from Johnson & Johnson lawsuits have cost the company an estimated $4.5 billion over the last several years. It first explored the bankruptcy strategy after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to review a $2.1 billion judgement in Missouri that went to 20 women who claimed their ovarian cancer had been caused by various talc products.

Prompted by the tens of thousands of lawsuits, J&J created a new entity called LTL Management LLC, which was designed solely to absorb its talc liabilities. That company immediately filed for bankruptcy, putting a hold on all lawsuits.

J&J Saving Big with Talc Bankruptcy Spinoff

J&J is the largest pharmaceutical company in the world, leading to outrage from plaintiffs at its ability to declare bankruptcy under a Texas law aimed at protecting corporate interests.

LTL Management listed its worth at $10 billion, along with $10 billion in liabilities, according to recent court records. Johnson & Johnson said the subsidiary will have $2 billion set aside to settle all talc claims.

The bankruptcy filing is designed to pressure claimants to accept lower settlements and avoid any excessive payouts. It also would speed up the process of compensating those who were injured.

In the most recent court proceedings, J&J contended that the allegations within the latest class-action suit were much like those in the cosmetic talc cases and should be lumped into the bankruptcy proceeding.

By contrast, the recent lawsuit brings claims of fraudulent legal testimony on behalf of J&J and little mention about consumer talc, which was a major reason the cases will be allowed to proceed.

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost 2022

Why Is Asbestos Dangerous

How much does it cost to remove a popcorn ceiling? You can expect to pay about $1.50 per sq. ft. on average or $1 to $2 per sq. ft. for popcorn ceiling removal that may or may not contain asbestos.

According to homeguide.com popcorn ceiling removal costs about $1.50 per sq. ft. with average prices ranging from $1 to $2 per sq. ft. to remove a popcorn ceiling not containing asbestos in the US for 2022. Most homeowners spent around $1,710.  Homeguide states a similar prices range with “most home spending an average range of $2,700 for a 1,800 sq. ft. home” and average prices ranging from $1,010 to $2,260. You can expect to pay even more for the cost of asbestos popcorn ceiling removal.

Cost of Asbestos Removal Popcorn Ceiling

How much does it cost to remove asbestos from a popcorn ceiling? If your popcorn ceiling tests positive for asbestos, you can contain or encapsulate the asbestos for a cost of $2 to $6 per sq. ft. or hire an asbestos removal contractor to remove asbestos for about $10 to $20 per sq. ft. according to HomeGuide. On average, asbestos removal from a popcorn ceiling costs about $2,000, with prices ranging from $1,500 to $2,500 in the US for 2022.

Popcorn Ceiling vs Asbestos Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost

CostHelper says Popcorn ceilings not containing asbestos can expect to pay about $1 to $3 per square foot or $250 to $900 to remove a popcorn ceiling from a 15’x20’ room or $1,200 to $1,400 for a 1,6000 sq. ft house.

Popcorn ceiling containing asbestos can expect to pay about $3 to $7 per square foot $900 to $2,100 to remove a popcorn ceiling from a 15’x20’ room or $4,500 to $11,500 for a 1,6000 sq. ft house.

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost Factors

Learn more about the cost factors that affect popcorn ceiling removal.

Asbestos Testing. A simple asbestos test will cost you anywhere from $50 to $100.

Ceiling Size. The size of your ceiling makes a difference in the cost. Most asbestos removal contractors charge anywhere from $1 to $3 per sq. ft. or $15 to $40 per hour according to HomeAdvisor.

Moving Furniture. Furniture will need to be moved in order to remove the popcorn ceiling. Furniture removal usually only adds about $100 or so to the overall cost.

Asbestos Removal. If asbestos is found in your popcorn ceiling it will cost more to remove.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos Tile Removal Costs 2022

Asbestos Floor TIles

Asbestos tile removal costs an average of $3,250 with costs ranging from $1,500 to in excess of $5,000 for the US in 2022. Read on to learn more.

An inspection will most likely be needed and a report made to a third party company so levels of asbestos can be confirmed. Once that is done, the contractor usually starts by installing plastic sheets and air equipment to lower air pressure. This helps to prevent fiber dispersal.

The material must be kept wet and double bagged or stored in appropriate plastic sheeting designed for the task, All workers must be certified in the proper manner for the removal of asbestos, just not those working directly with it.

No official standard for safe levels in homes have been set by the EPA or others but a general standard is that they’re below .01 asbestos fibers per cubic centimeter of air (0.01 f/cc). All waste material will be properly labeled and disposed of in a landfill that accepts asbestos waste.

Other Factors

Various factors impact the average cost you’ll pay, including where you live, how many licensed remediation companies operate in your area, and the size of your home and amount and location of the tile or flooring. Other factors include the the type of material you’re having removed, and the condition it is in and how it was originally installed.

Like any renovation work, different contractors will likely give you wildly varying bids for the same job, taking into account all of the above as well as a simpler factor that often comes into play: how much do they think you’ll pay.

Source: https://www.asbestostile.org/what-is-the-average-cost-of-asbestos-tile-removal/

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

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Asbestos Insulation Removal Costs 2022

How To Test For Asbestos In Popcorn Ceilings

Asbestos Insulation Removal

Asbestos removal may become an issue when a material containing asbestos is damaged, crumbling or flaking in your home. Read on to learn more about what to do and the costs associated with the removal of asbestos.

Asbestos was used very widely in building materials before the start of the 1970’s. In reality it is actually a carcinogen but can often be found in older buildings among pipe and duct ventilation, vermiculite attic insulation, wall and ceiling acoustic tiles, cement floor tiles and siding as well as floor tile adhesives.

However it is wise that is the asbestos containing materials are in your home are undamaged, leave them alone. According to the Environmental Protection Agency it is far more dangerous to disturb them. In fact in the majority of states you must disclose if asbestos is in your home prior to its sale. But if you are planning a remodel, removing the asbestos will be the best thing you can do if you are going to disturb it in any way.

Asbestos Removal Basics

The first thing to do is to have the material you suspect containing asbestos tested and then have it professionally removed.

  • Speak with the asbestos program in your region as well as the asbestos administrative department in the state where the property is or you can contact OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) regional office to establish the local regulations and requirements for your area.
  • Find accreited asbestos contractors and inspectors who are trained and licenced in the testing and removal of safe asbestos.
  • Conflict of interest can be avoided by having suspect materials tested by a certain company and the removal completed by a different company.
  • Preparation is key. It may be the case you and your family will have to move out of your house on a temporary basis while the asbestos is being removed from the property.

Getting A Contractor

There is nothing infra dig about using a flooring, siding or roofing contractor for this as long as they are trained and well practices in the removal of asbestos. Before the commencement of work, you will want to ensure you have a written contract clearly expressing the local, state and federal regulations the contractor is obliged to follow including the clean up of your premises and the disposal of the asbestos. At the end of the job, get written evidence from the contractor that the above procedures were completed correctly. Have a licensed asbestos inspector perform a follow-up check as a final step.

Asbestos Removal Costs

An initial inspecton for asbestos costs an average of $600 with prices ranging from $400 to $800 for the US in 2021.

Asbestos removal costs do vary depending on how much needs to be removed. But you can expect an average minimum fee of $2,250 with averages varying on the low to high end at between $1,500 and $3,000.

Total asbestos removal in a home measuring 1,500 square feet with asbestos in the floors, walls, ceilings, pipes and roof averages $25,000 with costs ranging from $20,000 to $30,000 for the US in 2021.

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In The News February 2022

On April 23, 2021, Stanford University Reported the following: (The whole article may be read here)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) largely remedies Superfund sites containing asbestos by capping them with soil to lock the buried toxin in place. But new research suggests that this may actually increase the likelihood of human exposure to the cancer-causing mineral.

Asbestos In The News February 2022

Friable asbestos ceiling materials are removed and double bagged at a quarantined facility at Naval Base Coronado Naval Air Station North Island. (Image credit: Jimmy Johnson/U.S. Navy)

“People have this idea that asbestos is all covered up and taken care of,” said Jane Willenbring, who is an associate professor of geological sciences at Stanford University’s School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences (Stanford Earth). “But this is still a lingering legacy pollutant and might be dribbling out pollution, little by little.”

Willenbring has published several studies about asbestos behavior and, most recently, turned her attention to the lack of information about how asbestos may move through the soils where it is stored. Through lab experiments with asbestos fibers, which were detailed in a paper published Jan. 27 in the Journal of Hazardous Materials Letters, she and colleagues determined that the soil’s organic material actually enables the asbestos to move through the ground and potentially into nearby water supplies.

They found that dissolved organic matter changes the electric charge on asbestos particles and makes them less sticky, thereby enabling them to move faster through soil. The work disproves the prevailing theory that asbestos fibers cannot easily move through soil – an assumption that has been made in part because of the mineral’s hair-like shape.

“It’s surprising that even though these little fibers are so long, because their shortest diameter is small enough, they can wind their way through these soil pores,” said Willenbring, who is senior author on the study.

Inhalation of asbestos increases the risk of developing lung disease and lung cancer, and exposure could occur through irrigation, taking showers, using humidifiers or other unfiltered sources that disperse water into the air.

A legacy pollutant

Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral that mainly forms in the subsurface, at the boundary of Earth’s oceanic and continental crusts. For much of the 20th century, it was revered as a miracle building material for its high heat capacity and insulation properties, and mining and production boomed worldwide. Following widespread evidence of its link to cancer, including a rare and aggressive form called mesothelioma, production of asbestos in the U.S. declined dramatically starting in the 1970s.

This illustration shows the potential transport pathways of asbestos fibers in groundwater from contaminated sites. (Image credit: Mohanty et al.)

In addition to thinking that the shape of the fibers would inhibit transport, the scientific community has been influenced by a 1977 EPA report that minimized the threat of asbestos moving through soil. Since then, new findings about the role of colloids – microscopic particles that remain dispersed within solutions rather than settling to the bottom – have led researchers to challenge the assumption that asbestos stays fixed in soil.

“Now we can show that exactly the thing that they do, which is add manure or other organic sludge to the asbestos piles that creates the production of dissolved organic matter, is exactly what causes the liberation of asbestos,” Willenbring said. “It’s actually facilitating the transport of asbestos fibers.”

In some ways, the team’s breakthrough about asbestos is not surprising because it aligns so closely with recent findings about the transport of colloids in soil, Willenbring said. But she was stunned by the scale of the problem: Millions of people in the U.S. are living near thousands of sites contaminated with asbestos.

At least 16 Superfund sites contain asbestos and areas where the mineral naturally occurs can also pose a risk.

Improving remediation

As part of the lab experiments, Willenbring and her team sampled soil from the BoRit Superfund Site in Ambler, Pennsylvania before it was capped in 2008. The waste dump is located next to a reservoir, as well as a stream that feeds water to the city of Philadelphia.

However, there is a silver lining to the team’s discovery.

“Not all types of dissolved organic matter have the same effect on asbestos mobility,” said lead study author Sanjay Mohanty, an assistant professor at UCLA’s Civil and Environmental Engineering who collaborated with Willenbring on the experiments. “Thus, by identifying the types that have the worst effect, the remediation design could exclude those organic amendments.”

As part of the remediation strategy, some sites include vegetation planted on top of the soil to prevent erosion. Willenbring’s ongoing research involves figuring out how fungal-vegetation associations may be able to extract iron and make the asbestos fibers less toxic to people.

“It’s not just inflammation in the lungs that’s a problem – there’s a process by which iron contained in the asbestos fiber is actually responsible for causing DNA damage, which can lead to cancer or mesothelioma,” Willenbring said.

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos Testing Costs 2022

How To Test For Asbestos In Popcorn Ceilings

The average for asbestos testing is about $517, with a typical range around $225 and $808. It may cost as low as $90 or high as $2,000 for the US in 2022. Testing costs increase with the buildings size and how complex the project is.

From around the 1900’s to around the 1970’s, contractors utilized this natural silicate in homes for its insulating capabilities and durability. Despite that, when damaged and aged, it flakes and crumbles, which emits its fibers into the air. When people breathe in carcinogenic fibers, it can lead to mesothelioma or Pulmonary fibrosis. It’s essential to get a professional to test for the presence of asbestos to find out if your business or home requires asbestos abatement or removal.

The cost of an asbestos survey or inspection is around an average of $495 $225 to $808 for the US in 2022. This test establishes the presence of asbestos to warrant professional removal. The price includes:

  • Optical inspection for general risks.
  • Collecting samples from areas like the insulation, roof, and walls.
  • Lab testing the samples.
  • Producing reports on the results.

Lab Testing Cost

The inspection price includes the cost of a lab test. Throughout the inspection, a professional will take every appropriate sample and send the samples to a lab. As an example, one sample is a couple of scrapings off of a textured ceiling to see if it needs the removal of the popcorn ceiling.

Report Costs

The price of the inspection typically includes the cost of an asbestos report because the lab fees are usually a part of the bundle. Following an examination, a report will be created that will confirm or deny the existence of hazardous fibers. You will provide these reports to an abatement professional to show where asbestos is located in your home.

Air Testing Pricing

You can expect to pay an average of $500 to the air for asbestosSubject to the number of samples you require and the size of your home, costs range around $200 to $800. This is comparable to the price of an inside air quality test, which sometimes includes asbestos in a list of wanted impurities.

Type 2 Asbestos Surveys

Today’s professionals denote to type two asbestos surveys as an “asbestos management survey,” which will cost around $200 and $800. These management surveys are really an inspection that’s a mixture of the previous type one tests and type two tests. It tests all the required samples and establishes vulnerable materials.

In essence, identifying surveys by “type” are a thing of the past. A type two is now part of what we now call an inspection or a management survey.

Asbestos Assessment Costs during a Home Inspection

Asbestos assessment costs throughout a home inspection is around $200 to $800 if you hire a professional independently from a home inspector. Nevertheless, if you hire a home inspector that is asbestos-certified, they can add a lesser fee than the average cost of a home inspection, that is about $330. It’s essential to acknowledge that normal home inspectors don’t do demolition, that includes scraping and taking samples unless they get permission from the homeowner.

Source:

  1. Learn How Much It Costs to Test For Asbestos.” HomeAdvisor, https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/environmental-safety/test-or-remove-asbestos/.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Commercial Cosmetic Talcum Powder As A Cause Of Mesothelioma In Women

Asbestos In Commercial Cosmetic Talcum Powder As A Cause Of Mesothelioma In Women

Occasionally we like to link to important government issues peer reviewed journals of scientific conclusions. In this case we present the findings of the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes Of Health and their report on Asbestos in commercial cosmetic talcum powder as a cause of mesothelioma in women. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4164883/

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

What Does Asbestos Look Like?

Asbestos In Houses

Asbestos was partially banned in the United States in 1989. The law made it illegal to use the cancer-causing mineral in new ways. Despite this, the federal government has not imposed a ban on buildings, residences, or products that have already been constructed or made with the carcinogen. The majority of asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) were also not removed from circulation forcibly. As a result, asbestos contamination testing can still detect dangerous amounts of asbestos in tens of thousands of houses and household products across the United States.

ACM is commonly encountered by homeowners and construction personnel during the remodeling of older structures. You can’t tell if anything is asbestos-contaminated just by looking at it. Some products (such as electrical fuse boxes) contain an ACM warning label, while many do not.

Under a microscope, three forms of asbestos (crocidolite, amosite, and chrysotile) appear as blue, brown, or white filaments. The fibers, on the other hand, are usually too small to perceive with the human eye. Furthermore, they are so light that they can float in the air for days.

Asbestos is often found in:

  • Adhesives
  • Bathroom tile
  • Boilers
  • Bricks
  • Ceiling tiles
  • Cement
  • Cladding
  • Drywall
  • Exterior siding
  • Fibro
  • Fire blankets
  • Fireproofed rope
  • Gas meter panels
  • Insulation
  • Kitchen tiles
  • Paints
  • Partitions
  • Pipes and lagging
  • Plaster
  • Popcorn ceilings
  • Shingles
  • Soffits
  • Textured paint
  • Weatherboard
  • Windowsills

Is it Possible to Detect Asbestos Through Smell?

The stench can sometimes indicate that your home is contaminated. Gas leaks and some types of mold produce scents that are apparent. Asbestos, on the other hand, has no odor. There is no odor in rooms when the carcinogen is built into the floors, walls, or ceiling. Even large quantities of asbestos dust have no odor or smell like ordinary dust.

People, on the other hand, inhale tiny (almost invisible) asbestos particles through their nose or mouth. These particles stick to tissues in the chest and stomach inside the body. Asbestos cannot be removed through surgery or any other method once it has entered the body.

Testing for Asbestos

The only way to confirm the presence of asbestos is to conduct a contamination test. Typically, asbestos is tested by specialists who have been trained to handle ACM without spreading it. Before construction can resume, asbestos abatement (removal) may be required, depending on the level of exposure. When building materials (such as walls, plumbing, and electrical wiring) are not damaged or moved by remodeling, older properties do not require asbestos testing. Do not alter the material if you suspect it contains asbestos, but it is still in good shape.

Using Asbestos Detection Professionals

Each state controls the use and disposal of ACM in addition to the legislation of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Most county and city services websites list state-approved asbestos testing professionals. To avoid a conflict of interest, make sure the person or company you employ for the evaluation isn’t affiliated with the asbestos abatement or removal company. Also, double-check their asbestos training (documented by an official federal or state board).

If I Inhaled Asbestos, What Should I Do?

Side effects from hazardous exposure can take years or decades to manifest. Symptoms of asbestos-related ailments include abdominal swelling, recurrent fever, and a chronic cough.

Asbestos-related diseases include:

  • Asbestosis
  • Colon cancer
  • Larynx cancer
  • Lung cancer
  • Mesothelioma
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Pleural effusion
  • Pleural plaques
  • Rectal cancer
  • Stomach cancer
  • Throat cancer

Asbestos exposure causes no immediate symptoms. As a result, you may not be aware of your carcinogen exposure right away (or for years). Those who have inhaled asbestos and are concerned about their health should be examined. Patients with mesothelioma who are diagnosed early have a better chance of receiving therapy.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

How to Tell The Difference Between Cellulose and Asbestos Insulation 2021

Asbestos In The News 2021

With asbestos still being used as a very commonly used fire retardant and a very popular insulator right until the end of the 1980’s. It was very versatile, affordable and it could be used in tiles and blow it with another material, vermiculite.

Differences Between Asbestos And Cellulose Insulation

Before we review the differences between asbestos and cellulose insulation, it is worth comprehending the properties regarding each of these materials.

Asbestos Insulation

Many people do not know that asbestos is, in fact, a natural mineral. asbestos is in general terms flexible and soft but also has great corrosion resistant and heat resistant properties. From the early 1950’s for a period of nearly forty years, the construction industry used asbestos as an insulator and fire retardant. When you view older buildings and houses, you will still find asbestos in drywall, tiles, tile grout and in the attic. That being said, so long as there are no damage or wall cavities exposing asbestos fibers in the living areas of the property, it is deemed to be safe. However, it becomes a very serious health hazard when asbestos particles become airborne and are able to reach the areas of the proeprty you occupy.

Cellulose Insulation

As an asbestos alternative, cellulose insulation is made from many different materials including cardboard, hemp, straw, newspaper, and many other different materials. When a paper-based cellulose mix is utilized by builders, it is treated with something called boric acid to give it fire resistance properties.

The two most common forms of cellulose insulation include dry cellulose and that is also known as loose-fill insulation. Builders will use a blower to blow the cellulose into the wall through holes. it can also be used to fill wall cavities. Wet spray cellulose is something builders use to apply to walls that have been newly constructed. The primary difference between dry cellulose and wet spray is that water is added during the sprying process. it provides a better seal for the prevention of heat loss.

Like asbestos, cellulose works well within pipes, walls and around wiring. it assists in both suppressing fires and both insulating your home. Cellulose also utilizes material that is recycled and that is a big advantage for owners of buildings looking to go green.

Differences

So now you understand the differences in the ingredients, they do look very similar when they are inspected. Although it is a different insulator, there are similar issues with vermiculite attic insulation as it is a very difficult proposition to see whether asbestos is contained within. The best thing to do is not to touch it but obtain the services of a professional to extract some samples and get a confirmation as to whether it contains asbestos. If asbestos is contained, you will want to seriously consider instituting a program of asbestos management or to completely remove the asbestos.

What To Do Next

When more than ten square feet of asbestos, you need the services of a professional abatement company. When you are handling larger projects, there is an extremely high risk of exposure and contamination not only to you but also those around you.

The professional contractor will quickly and safely remove the asbestos and with the set-up of barriers surrounding the work area to prevent tenants from coming into contact with asbestos. Reverse airflow will be used to keep the asbestos fibers from spreading. They will then wear equipment with special protective qualities and cleanse the area with HEPA filter vacuums and then properly dispose of the asbestos.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

How to Tell The Difference Between Cellulose and Asbestos Insulation 2022

Asbestos In The News 2021

With asbestos still being used as a very commonly used fire retardant and a very popular insulator right until the end of the 1980’s. It was very versatile, affordable and it could be used in tiles and blow it with another material, vermiculite.

Differences Between Asbestos And Cellulose Insulation

Before we review the differences between asbestos and cellulose insulation, it is worth comprehending the properties regarding each of these materials.

Asbestos Insulation

Many people do not know that asbestos is, in fact, a natural mineral. asbestos is in general terms flexible and soft but also has great corrosion resistant and heat resistant properties. From the early 1950’s for a period of nearly forty years, the construction industry used asbestos as an insulator and fire retardant. When you view older buildings and houses, you will still find asbestos in drywall, tiles, tile grout and in the attic. That being said, so long as there are no damage or wall cavities exposing asbestos fibers in the living areas of the property, it is deemed to be safe. However, it becomes a very serious health hazard when asbestos particles become airborne and are able to reach the areas of the proeprty you occupy.

Cellulose Insulation

As an asbestos alternative, cellulose insulation is made from many different materials including cardboard, hemp, straw, newspaper, and many other different materials. When a paper-based cellulose mix is utilized by builders, it is treated with something called boric acid to give it fire resistance properties.

The two most common forms of cellulose insulation include dry cellulose and that is also known as loose-fill insulation. Builders will use a blower to blow the cellulose into the wall through holes. it can also be used to fill wall cavities. Wet spray cellulose is something builders use to apply to walls that have been newly constructed. The primary difference between dry cellulose and wet spray is that water is added during the sprying process. it provides a better seal for the prevention of heat loss.

Like asbestos, cellulose works well within pipes, walls and around wiring. it assists in both suppressing fires and both insulating your home. Cellulose also utilizes material that is recycled and that is a big advantage for owners of buildings looking to go green.

Differences

So now you understand the differences in the ingredients, they do look very similar when they are inspected. Although it is a different insulator, there are similar issues with vermiculite attic insulation as it is a very difficult proposition to see whether asbestos is contained within. The best thing to do is not to touch it but obtain the services of a professional to extract some samples and get a confirmation as to whether it contains asbestos. If asbestos is contained, you will want to seriously consider instituting a program of asbestos management or to completely remove the asbestos.

What To Do Next

When more than ten square feet of asbestos, you need the services of a professional abatement company. When you are handling larger projects, there is an extremely high risk of exposure and contamination not only to you but also those around you.

The professional contractor will quickly and safely remove the asbestos and with the set-up of barriers surrounding the work area to prevent tenants from coming into contact with asbestos. Reverse airflow will be used to keep the asbestos fibers from spreading. They will then wear equipment with special protective qualities and cleanse the area with HEPA filter vacuums and then properly dispose of the asbestos.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

How To Insulate Walls Without Removing The Drywall

Asbestos In Houses

To insulate walls without removing the drywall holes on the interior or exterior of the home are cut.  Insulation materials are blown or sprayed between the studs to fill in wall cavities with insulation.  This, along with attic insulation, helps create a more energy efficient home that requires less natural gas or electricity to stay comfortable.

Wall Insulation

When it comes to high energy costs, it has really made homeowners much more aware of having the right insulation. There are some experts that have stated that a person can save about 15% on their energy bill by sealing up any air leaks and even adding some insulation, but that will be based on the location and age of the house.

Older houses, especially those that were built around World War II, are not insulated to more modern standards, but almost every house can benefit from adding insulation. Specifics will be based on the type of house, but there are many options for all without having to remove the drywall in your home.

Check Your Needs

You will need to check out sources such as the North American Insulation Manufacturers Association to see just how much insulation you are going to need. Insulation will be rated by R value, which is the resistance to heat. Most of the United States will need to have between R-60 to R-37 in the attic and between R-16 to R-12 in the walls.

Exterior Walls

You may add insulation to your walls without removing it by cutting holes into the siding. You can blow spray foam or cellulose into the walls from outside. Just cut a 1 inch to 2-inch hole between the studs at the top of the wall and then spray the insulation into the hole using a hose. Replace the cutouts, fill using wood filler and then sand smooth and paint to restore your siding.

Basement Walls

Insulating the basement walls in your home helps keep your home a more even temperature throughout the year.   Basement walls can be insulated with foam board, spray foam, blown-in, and spray foam insulation.  For basements that are finished and have sheetrock insulation contractors use similar methods to retrofitting exterior wall insulation installation.  Holes are cut to install the insulation and then are patched and painted over.

Attics

The easiest place for you to add insulation is going to be in your attic, under your roof. That is where adding insulation will be most beneficial. Another option is to add some loose fill insulation like fiberglass beads, cellulose, or rock wool. These types of insulation can be bought in bags at a supply store. You can add the loose fill on your existing insulation which has been installed in older homes. You should add between 7 to 12 inches of insulation which meets the requirement.

Roll or Batt

Another option for your attic will be roll or batt insulation which is made of wool, fiberglass or cotton. They will have similar R values, but fiberglass is very common and easily purchased at a supply store. Fiberglass batt is similar to those that are placed in your house wall during construction. You can lay rolls or batts between the joists in the ceiling or over them and make sure to place them on top of existing insulation.

Spray Foam

Spray foam insulation is a more modern and popular insulation type that you can add without needing to remove your drywall. This material is sprayed as a liquid which will expand when it makes contact with air. It will have a fluffy, soft appearance but a high R value. It will expand to fill any cracks so there will be no air openings where cold air can get in or for hot air to escape. In the attic it is normally sprayed between the rafters and the excess material is trimmed using a saw or knife.

How Blown In Insulation Is Installed Behind Drywall

This process is often called retrofitting and involves cutting access holes, blowing in insulation, and then patching.  Some homeowners with the time and tools are able to do this, but professional retrofitting is faster and generally more effective.  Training and experience make a big difference in how well the new insulation performs.  It’s possible to add blown in insulation to attics, walls, under floors and even the crawl space in your home.  Learn how the pros install insulation between studs without removing the drywall.

Step 1. Drill Holes In The Wall

To install the insulation without completely removing the drywall our pros find the studs in your walls.  Using a stud finder to mark off the studs with a pencil.  Drops cloths are used to protect floors and make cleanup easier as 2 inch holes are drilled to fill each of these wall cavities.  The holes are drilled as high as possible so insulation naturally piles up and creates an even layer of insulation.

Step 2. Blow In The Insulation

Our professional team of insulation installers work together to place the hose in the wall and slowly inch it out as the insulation is blown in tight.  This creates the evenly distributed effective insulation you need for your walls. Dirt and dust may be kicked up during this process so our team wears masks, gloves and goggles for personal safety and protection.

Step 3. Patching & Painting

Once the walls are filled with the insulation the installation holes are patched.  This is done by either saving the drywall discs cut as you created the access points or cutting new plugs.  Use drywall tape to secure the disc or patch in place, cover it with spackle and let it dry.  Once all of the holes are patched and dried the last step is painting the walls to make sure it looks uniform.

This process drastically improves home’s thermal efficiency in both summer and winter.  Stay cooler in when it’s hot and warmer when it’s cold without blowing your budget on utilities.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos Testing Costs 2021

How To Test For Asbestos In Popcorn Ceilings

The average for asbestos testing is about $517, with a typical range around $225 and $808. It may cost as low as $90 or high as $2,000 for the US in 2021. Testing costs increase with the buildings size and how complex the project is.

From around the 1900’s to around the 1970’s, contractors utilized this natural silicate in homes for its insulating capabilities and durability. Despite that, when damaged and aged, it flakes and crumbles, which emits its fibers into the air. When people breathe in carcinogenic fibers, it can lead to mesothelioma or Pulmonary fibrosis. It’s essential to get a professional to test for the presence of asbestos to find out if your business or home requires asbestos abatement or removal.

The cost of an asbestos survey or inspection is around an average of $495 $225 to $808 for the US in 2021. This test establishes the presence of asbestos to warrant professional removal. The price includes:

  • Optical inspection for general risks.
  • Collecting samples from areas like the insulation, roof, and walls.
  • Lab testing the samples.
  • Producing reports on the results.

Lab Testing Cost

The inspection price includes the cost of a lab test. Throughout the inspection, a professional will take every appropriate sample and send the samples to a lab. As an example, one sample is a couple of scrapings off of a textured ceiling to see if it needs the removal of the popcorn ceiling.

Report Costs

The price of the inspection typically includes the cost of an asbestos report because the lab fees are usually a part of the bundle. Following an examination, a report will be created that will confirm or deny the existence of hazardous fibers. You will provide these reports to an abatement professional to show where asbestos is located in your home.

Air Testing Pricing

You can expect to pay an average of $500 to the air for asbestosSubject to the number of samples you require and the size of your home, costs range around $200 to $800. This is comparable to the price of an inside air quality test, which sometimes includes asbestos in a list of wanted impurities.

Type 2 Asbestos Surveys

Today’s professionals denote to type two asbestos surveys as an “asbestos management survey,” which will cost around $200 and $800. These management surveys are really an inspection that’s a mixture of the previous type one tests and type two tests. It tests all the required samples and establishes vulnerable materials.

In essence, identifying surveys by “type” are a thing of the past. A type two is now part of what we now call an inspection or a management survey.

Asbestos Assessment Costs during a Home Inspection

Asbestos assessment costs throughout a home inspection is around $200 to $800 if you hire a professional independently from a home inspector. Nevertheless, if you hire a home inspector that is asbestos-certified, they can add a lesser fee than the average cost of a home inspection, that is about $330. It’s essential to acknowledge that normal home inspectors don’t do demolition, that includes scraping and taking samples unless they get permission from the homeowner.

Source:

  1. Learn How Much It Costs to Test For Asbestos.” HomeAdvisor, https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/environmental-safety/test-or-remove-asbestos/.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Appliances

Asbestos In Appliances

Products that once contained asbestos can be broadly divided into three ranges of products. Read on to learn more.

Handheld and Small Appliances

Handheld and smaller-than-a-breadbox sized items that had to be both lightweight and heat resistant often made it onto this list. Also, items that may have contained no major asbestos component may still have included asbestos electrical insulation in their cords or circuits.

  • Hairdryers
  • Toasters
  • Hotplates/Bunsen burners
  • Oven mitts and other heat resistant textiles
  • The wicks in lamps

Large and Installed Appliances

Larger appliances, including portable, free-standing, and installed products also could contain asbestos products as heat and electrical insulation and textiles.

  • Dishwashers
  • Ovens and stoves
  • Wood-burning stoves
  • Decorative fireplace logs
  • Ironing boards and their covers
  • Electrical blankets
  • Heaters
  • Crockpots and popcorn poppers

Talcum and Vermiculite Products

It’s important to remember that asbestos is a naturally-occurring mineral that is mined. While this silica-based mineral only forms under certain circumstances, it can also form in or near other minerals, potentially contaminating them. Both talcum (talc powder) and vermiculite both can be contaminated, and before testing was done to make sure these minerals were screened, both could be contaminated by asbestos.

Source: https://fibercontrolinc.com/types-of-appliances-that-contain-asbestos

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Auto Repair, Brakes And Clutches

Asbestos In Auto Repair Brakes And Clutches.

Asbestos has been a component in linings, clutch facings, and brakes pads for a long time and millions of them on the shelf of an auto parts store or operating in vehicles can still be found today. That said they are not normally used in the production of new components. Read on to learn more.

Hazards

As clutches and brakes wear down through regular usage, dust containing asbestos is released into the outside environment as well as getting trapped within the vehicle housing to be released when those areas are being worked on. Asbestos dust is also spread further by using a vacuum cleaner to sweep up the break residue and in a similar way to use compressed air.

Therefore, it should be obvious that mechanics are at high risk for asbestos exposure. Cleaning drum brakes can release asbestos fibers by the million around the face of a mechanic, even striking a brake drum with an object like a hammer can cause the release of asbestos fibers.  It can get on their hands and be swallowed as well. Asbestos lingers once it is in the air and can be inhaled by customers as well as mechanics. Not to mention the dust will remain on their clothes, endangering other people they may meet.

Minimizing Dangers

Government regulations state any shop that does in excess of five brake jobs per year must use special equipment so asbestos exposure is minimized. These include a see-through enclosure surrounding the brake system and a vacuum with a HEPA filter. Another method is low-pressure sprays used to wet down the brake assembly and the water runoff when collected. Asbestos must also be collected and sealed as well as labeled in containers that cannot be opened.

The Home Mechanic

As home auto mechanics are still a very popular pastime those who work with clutches and brakes containing asbestos are also at risk and the problem may even be more intense as they do not often have the safety equipment found in auto shops.

The SPA states at home mechanics should refrain from using compressed air to clean brakes to prevent the release of asbestos and should also use parts that are preground to avoid asbestos exposure.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.