Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost 2020

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost 2020

How much does it cost to remove a popcorn ceiling? You can expect to pay about $1.50 per sq. ft. on average or $1 to $2 per sq. ft. for popcorn ceiling removal that may or may not contain asbestos.

According to homeguide.com popcorn ceiling removal costs about $1.50 per sq. ft. with average prices ranging from $1 to $2 per sq. ft. to remove a popcorn ceiling not containing asbestos in the US for 202. Most homeowners spent around $1,710.  Homeguide states a similar prices range with “most home spending an average range of $2,700 for a 1,800 sq. ft. home” and average prices ranging from $1,010 to $2,260. You can expect to pay even more for the cost of asbestos popcorn ceiling removal.

Cost of Asbestos Removal Popcorn Ceiling

How much does it cost to remove asbestos from a popcorn ceiling? If your popcorn ceiling tests positive for asbestos, you can contain or encapsulate the asbestos for a cost of $2 to $6 per sq. ft. or hire an asbestos removal contractor to remove asbestos for about $10 to $20 per sq. ft. according to HomeGuide. On average, asbestos removal from a popcorn ceiling costs about $2,000, with prices ranging from $1,500 to $2,500 in the US for 2020.

Popcorn Ceiling vs Asbestos Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost

CostHelper says Popcorn ceilings not containing asbestos can expect to pay about $1 to $3 per square foot or $250 to $900 to remove a popcorn ceiling from a 15’x20’ room or $1,200 to $1,400 for a 1,6000 sq. ft house.

Popcorn ceiling containing asbestos can expect to pay about $3 to $7 per square foot $900 to $2,100 to remove a popcorn ceiling from a 15’x20’ room or $4,500 to $11,500 for a 1,6000 sq. ft house.

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost Factors

Learn more about the cost factors that affect popcorn ceiling removal.

Asbestos Testing. A simple asbestos test will cost you anywhere from $50 to $100.

Ceiling Size. The size of your ceiling makes a difference in the cost. Most asbestos removal contractors charge anywhere from $1 to $3 per sq. ft. or $15 to $40 per hour according to HomeAdvisor.

Moving Furniture. Furniture will need to be moved in order to remove the popcorn ceiling. Furniture removal usually only adds about $100 or so to the overall cost.

Asbestos Removal. If asbestos is found in your popcorn ceiling it will cost more to remove.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Ten Places You Can Find Asbestos

Asbestos Around The House

Asbestos can be found in many unexpected places. Here are ten spots where asbestos may be found where you may not realize it. read on to learn more.

Seals And Sealants

Asbestos was often used in caulking in windows and doors until the 1970’s. It was also used on furnace doors, gasket seals, old coal chutes and other heat resistant areas.

Bowling Balls

Bowling balls can last for decades. And while most modern bowling balls are not made with asbestos, that perfect nine-pound, magenta bowling ball you chose at the bowling alley may actually be an older, asbestos-filled one.

Siding And Roofing

Most cement or asphalt composites used in roofing and siding are generally considered nonfriable, but those with a large paper make up are friable because they come apart with pressure. Both types release breathable particles of asbestos when cutting into or removed by tearing and pose a health hazard.

Talcum Powder

This seemingly harmless substance is raising red flags because of a dangerous risk of asbestos exposure. The connection between talc and asbestos involves the close proximity of the two minerals on the earth’s surface, which often results in contamination.

Ducts And Pipes

Old systems of steam piping and even some hot water plumbing are wrapped in asbestos-containing “blankets” that pose a serious risk when removed or cut without the help of a professional who uses protective measures to dampen the release of particles.

Crayons

Through independent tests, asbestos fibers were found in four of the 28 boxes of crayons tested, and two of the 21 crime-scene fingerprint kits.

Books And Bindings

“Fahrenheit 451” has a notorious past for being bound with asbestos in hopes the book would never be burned.  It is not the first time book bindings contained asbestos. In fact, reports show bookbinders were exposed to asbestos in the mid-1900’s.

Ceiling Tiles

Obvious forms of asbestos ceiling tiles are the 9 by 9 inch (22.86 by 22.86 cm) or 12 by 12 inches (30.48 by 30.48 cm) white or off-white panels held up in a grid system. Adding or removing a tile involves pushing it up from the grid frame and angling it down and out or up and in place. Basements in homes, in particular, might feature the tiles because of their soundproof qualities and low cost. It’s estimated that 5 to 10 percent of the ceiling tiles in the U.S. contain asbestos.

Wallpaper

Removing layers of old paper that have hung in there, adhering to walls for decades, is a remodeling project of major proportions. It involves lots of time and elbow grease. In homes papered before 1980, it can even be downright dangerous to undertake wallpaper removal because many vinyl papers before that time contain asbestos

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

How Do You Get Rid Of Asbestos Siding Safely?

How Do You Get Rid of Asbestos Siding Safely?

If your home has tested positive for asbestos, you will want to remove it as soon as possible. So, how exactly do you get rid of asbestos siding safely? In some cases, the best option may actually be to not remove the asbestos siding at all. Instead, installing brand new siding placed on top of the old asbestos could be an option.

However, you do have the choice of removing asbestos in two different ways:

Hire A Local Asbestos Abatement Company In Phoenix, Arizona

The option of having your asbestos removed by a professional company can lead you into a world of unexpected expenses. This will be a regulated professional that meets all state requirements to work with you and your home. Give these people the courtesy and respect they deserve, as the service they provide saves countless lives.

The professional usually has an arsenal of items they must wear when performing the removal, such as a suit, respirator, shields for the impacted areas, and copious amounts of water to apply to hold the dust down.

When searching for a professional abatement company, use these key terms and you will be guaranteed to find a “certified asbestos removal company in Phoenix Arizona.” Then narrow down the search by using different terms, focusing on the area you would like remediated.

Removing the Asbestos Siding Yourself

In many parts of the U.S., there really are no laws that hold you accountable for having to hire an asbestos removal company. On the off-chance that you really wanted to remove asbestos from your home, you could perform such a task. Although in some places there are some laws on the disposal of the asbestos, but not the removal process.

This can be an entire Do It Yourself (DIY) asbestos removal job; just be very safe and cautious when approaching the removal process.

When working on the asbestos removal, there are some key factors to pay attention to when it comes to your safety. Be careful when cutting, drilling, and sanding of any kind – or anything that creates any sort of dust that emits into the air. As mentioned before, this dust is highly toxic and can impact your health in various ways. Some things you can do are removing a nail, and/or removing the entire siding itself. This should not put you in any danger unless the conditions of the shingles are brittle and cause smoke to emit.

Things You Will Need to Remove Your Own Asbestos from Your Home.

  • Crowbar to remove the nails.
  • A nail-pulling device.
  • Knife or scissors to sever the polyethylene sheet.
  • HEPA respirator.
  • Disposable garments to clean, such as coveralls, rubber boots, safety glasses, and rubber gloves.
  • Container to hold the debris.
  • Disposable bags meant for asbestos removal and some duct tape for the bags.
  • Basic garden hose with water and a spray attachment.
  • Liquid dishwashing detergent.

Instructions For Asbestos Removal

Obtain Permit

Getting a permit may sound harder than it really Is. Most local departments will issue these with ease. You can also head directly to an agency that primarily deals with this. There is usually no way around this; the area you live in will most likely require a permit.

Hang Up Signs For Others’ Awareness

Be sure to post signs letting others know of the removal process. Also, be sure to place about a six-foot distance of the six-mil plastic sheeting across the home where the removal is taking place. Another key element to making the process easier is to work in the shade so the wet area remains moist. Also, be sure to create some sort of entrance and exit to the work area with the plastic sheeting to ensure maximum safety .

Cover Your Entire Body

Safety is the number one priority when it comes to doing this job by yourself. Some of the equipment used by most professionals is (but not limited to): disposable coveralls, gloves, rubber boots, HEPA respirators, and goggles.

Start The Asbestos Siding Removal Process

Begin chipping away at the asbestos-filled siding and removing piece by piece, by pulling any nails or trimming down. If needed, lift the siding with the pry tools to expose the nails more. Be sure not to release any debris into the air. Keep wetting the siding and place it onto a plastic sheet meant for removal.

Double Bag The Disposable Asbestos Contents

When getting rid of the Asbestos-filled contents, be sure to double bag your trash and pre-mark the bags to let others know of the asbestos. Seal off the contents with duct tape to ensure a solid seal on the bag. Only use the 6-mil polyethylene plastic bags/wrap, as this is the only material durable enough for these contents.

Dispose Of Asbestos Filled Debris From Location

This is the final step in the process of removing asbestos siding from your home. As mentioned, double bag the remaining asbestos debris. For any extra cleanup, use moist rags and shower afterwards.

NEVER Sweep Or Vacuum Asbestos Leftovers. This Causes Asbestos Microfibers To Enter The Air And Become Highly Toxic.

The next step would be to remove the asbestos trash that has been collected. There are specific licensed disposal locations that can take in this specific type of waste. Do proper research to find a place to dispose of your debris properly.

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Is Asbestos In Popcorn Ceilings Safe?

Asbestos Removal Costs 2020

Spray-on popcorn ceilings were immensely popular in the early 1950s to 1980s. Better known as “popcorn ceiling,” “stucco ceiling” and/or even called “cottage cheese ceiling,” this material was generally one to ten percent asbestos. So, it begs the question, is asbestos in popcorn ceilings safe?

Identifying Asbestos In Ceilings

There are many ways to figure out whether your popcorn ceiling has any asbestos. One way is to purchase a kit that allows you to test your ceiling or you can pay a professional asbestos removal company to visit your home.

When purchasing an asbestos kit, you will have to extract a sample of the ceiling and mail it into a lab for examination. Hiring a professional team is tremendously safer, but most likely a pricier option. If you in turn do go down the path of testing for the asbestos yourself be sure to also test the ceiling for lead paint, as that was also commonly used during the era of the popcorn ceiling.

Simply put, any percentage of asbestos in your ceiling is dangerous, so be sure that nothing disturbs it and decide whether or not you’d like to encapsulate it, or have it removed altogether.

Stucco ceiling overall is an easily damageable material. This material can even release toxic smoke at even the smallest of disturbances. Inhaling such asbestos smoke can cause serious injury and can even lead to diseases such as asbestosis, or lung cancer, and possibly mesothelioma.

It’s Not About How Much – It’s The Excess That Spreads

Whether the base level of your ceiling has one or ten percent asbestos, the same rules apply. The ceiling actually won’t damage your health if it is untouched by anything or properly quarantined away. In the long run, it is way safer to just have it professionally removed.

Tips On How To Live With Asbestos In Your Popcorn Ceiling:

  • Be sure to not pester the ceiling with any objects that may damage it such as nails, and/or screws.
  • Tall shelves can sometimes be an issue if they’re tall enough to scrape the ceiling, so be careful.
  • Don’t bother any of the contaminated areas with any furniture or longer objects when moving in/out.
  • Peeling, dampness, and even age to your popcorn ceiling may result in having to get it professionally removed or quarantined away.

How Can You Quarantine Your Asbestos Filled Popcorn Ceiling?

When It comes to quarantining your ceiling this means to not have any sort of access to the location so it doesn’t release any asbestos dust. The typical ways of solving the issue can be covering the location with new ceiling panels or you may use vinyl paint. The best decision, though, would be to hire a professional.

How Can You Remove Asbestos Popcorn Ceiling?

In most cases, it’s better to have professionals resolve the issue properly right from the jump. With this in mind if it isn’t immediately resolved, it may become more expensive down the road. It is up to you as the homeowner to do what you want with it. In the instance that you do not want to remove this, check with your local laws as some states have rules against asbestos being in multifamily homes or commercial buildings. Single-family homeowners have mostly full access to perform asbestos removal on their own, although every state/city is different.

Precautions When Removing Your Asbestos Popcorn Ceiling

  • Furniture in the room is a no go.
  • Turn off the ventilation system within your home to contain the toxicity and avoid spreading.
  • Windows and doors need to be sealed with plastic.
  • All peoples/animals shouldn’t be near the area without any protective gear.
  • Respirators with air filters are very common in instances during removal, so be sure to wear one if possible, paired with an air purifier.
  • Cover any open skin, hair and avoid any contact with asbestos debris.
  • Wet the popcorn ceiling material as this will prevent the asbestos from entering the air.
  • Asbestos waste should be disposed of separately from normal trash.

Neglecting any guidelines enforced within your community can be costly. Some insurances doesn’t even cover asbestos contamination due to renovations on the home.

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos And Popcorn Ceilings

Asbestos And Popcorn Ceilings

Also known as textured or acoustic ceilings, popcorn ceilings are easily recognized because of their bumpy texture. Many popcorn ceilings contain asbestos. read on to learn more.

Popcorn ceilings were popular from the 1930’s to the 1990’s for the following reasons:

  • Absorbs echoes and noise
  • Conceals imperfections
  • Cover ceilings that are unfinished

Once, Asbestos Was A Miracle Material!

Durable, lightweight, and non-flammable as well as being inexpensive it was considered an ideal material. Sadly, it was found to cause serious health problems and as a result it has killed many people. Normally there is no expiration of ceiling materials, so it is likely to be found in buildings after the 1977 US Government ban.

Those At Risk

  • Drilling into the ceiling to do electrical, plumbing or ductwork
  • Applying the popcorn finish
  • Mixing the material on-site
  • Working in a factory that manufactured popcorn ceiling finishes

Construction Jobs

Asbestos fibers are portable—they can be carried from one environment to another on surfaces like hair, clothes or skin. Cases of mesothelioma, a cancer caused by asbestos, have been found in spouses of workers, even though they never set foot on a construction site.

Health Risks

Mesothelioma has a long latency timeand can take decades to develop after the initial exposure. For this reason, it can be difficult for mesothelioma victims to specify where exactly their exposure took place.

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos Insulation Removal

Asbestos And Popcorn Ceilings

Asbestos Insulation Removal

Asbestos removal may become an issue when a material containing asbestos is damaged, crumbling or flaking in your home. Read on to learn more about what to do and the costs associated with the removal of asbestos.

Asbestos was used very widely in building materials before the start of the 1970’s. In reality it is actually a carcinogen but can often be found in older buildings among pipe and duct ventilation, vermiculite attic insulation, wall and ceiling acoustic tiles, cement floor tiles and siding as well as floor tile adhesives.

However it is wise that is the asbestos containing materials are in your home are undamaged, leave them alone. According to the Environmental Protection Agency it is far more dangerous to disturb them. In fact in the majority of states you must disclose if asbestos is in your home prior to its sale. But if you are planning a remodel, removing the asbestos will be the best thing you can do if you are going to disturb it in any way.

Asbestos Removal Basics

The first thing to do is to have the material you suspect containing asbestos tested and then have it professionally removed.

  • Speak with the asbestos program in your region as well as the asbestos administrative department in the state where the property is or you can contact OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) regional office to establish the local regulations and requirements for your area.
  • Find accreited asbestos contractors and inspectors who are trained and licenced in the testing and removal of safe asbestos.
  • Conflict of interest can be avoided by having suspect materials tested by a certain company and the removal completed by a different company.
  • Preparation is key. It may be the case you and your family will have to move out of your house on a temporary basis while the asbestos is being removed from the property.

Getting A Contractor

There is nothing infra dig about using a flooring, siding or roofing contractor for this as long as they are trained and well practices in the removal of asbestos. Before the commencement of work, you will want to ensure you have a written contract clearly expressing the local, state and federal regulations the contractor is obliged to follow including the clean up of your premises and the disposal of the asbestos. At the end of the job, get written evidence from the contractor that the above procedures were completed correctly. Have a licensed asbestos inspector perform a follow-up check as a final step.

Asbestos Removal Costs

An initial inspecton for asbestos costs an average of $600 with prices ranging from $400 to $800 for the US in 2019.

Asbestos removal costs do vary depending on how much needs to be removed. But you can expect an average minimum fee of $2,250 with averages varying on the low to high end at between $1,500 and $3,000.

Total asbestos removal in a home measuring 1,500 square feet with asbestos in the floors, walls, ceilings, pipes and roof averages $25,000 with costs ranging from $20,000 to $30,000 for the US in 2019.

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos And Cooling Towers

Asbestos Cooling Towers

The concept of a cooling tower itself suggests the use of asbestos. A cooling tower is meant to convert excess heat from a coolant or water into waste heat and let it off into the atmosphere. Depending on the type and the use of the tower, the makeup of cooling towers can vary significantly.

One of the most common uses of a cooling tower has been the circulating of water in oil refineries. It has also found use in chemical and power plants. Some of these towers are actually small in size and can easily be fitted onto a roof. The larger varieties are free-standing structures.

Regardless of size, cooling towers made with asbestos were naturally hazardous to those around. The main people who may have been affected by this are HVAC workers who are called on to service cooling towers. As with all things, when cooling towers aged and the materials that made them up were subject to natural wear and tear, the asbestos came loose and became free-flowing in the atmosphere.

There is also the possibility of the fibers being discharged into the air via steam released from the cooling tower. There is no exhalation of these fibers once they are inhaled. The damage is permanent and can cause inflammation as well as tumors. Though the use of asbestos-containing materials was severely restricted in the 1980s, it was too late for many individuals who had already contracted illnesses such as asbestosis, pleural plaques and even the fatal form of cancer called mesothelioma.

Unfortunately, many manufacturers of asbestos-containing products knew of the associated dangers of the substance and continued to use it. Often, no protective gear was ever provided to the people who came in contact with this substance.

Phoenix Valley Insulation Removal

If you’ve got asbestos insulation in your property it poses a health hazard.  Barrier insulation provides insulation removal services in the Phoenix Valley and is an insulation installation contractor.  That means we can remove dangerous, damaged, or ineffective insulation and replace it with the highest performance insulation on the market.  From spray foam insulation to loose fill blown in insulation we will help you choose a cost effective and high performance insulation solution to help keep you comfortable all year long.

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

What is OSHA?

What Does OSHA Stand For

Upwards of 90 million people in the US are spending their days on the job. As a nation, they’re our most important resource. And shockingly up until 1970, there were no unified and concise requirements available for safety in the workplace and their protection against health risks.

How did OSHA Form?

In 1970, Congress took into consideration annual figures like these:

  • Job-related accidents took into account for more than 14,000 worker deaths.
  • Almost 2 1/2 million workers had been disabled.
  • 10 times as many person-days were missed from occupational disabilities as from strikes.
  • Approximated new cases of job-related diseases reached 300,000

Regarding lost production and income, compensation for disability and expenses, medical, the burden on the nation’s commerce was astounding. The human cost was outside calculations. Consequently, the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1979 was passed by both parties of Congress “…to assure so far as possible every working man and woman in the Nation safe and healthful working conditions and to preserve our human resources.”

What does OSHA Stand For?

Under Congress’ Act, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was developed under the Department of Labor.

In simple terms, OSHA is the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and its responsibility for worker safety and health safeguarding.

Since its creation in 1970, OSHA has reduced the work fatality rate in excess of half, decreased the general injury and illness rates in industries that OSHA has focused its attention, practically eliminated brown lung disease in textile industries and decreased excavation and trenching deaths by 35%.

OSHA is managed through the Department of Labor (DOL). The Department of Labor regulates and enforces in excess of 180 federal laws. These regulations and the mandates that execute them cover a lot of workplace activities for around 10 million employers and their 125 million employees.

Who Does OSHA Cover?

OSHA establishes which standards are applied to your workplace and requires you to comply with these terms and conditions.

Every single employee and their employers under Federal Government jurisdiction are covered by OSHA. Coverage is offered one of two ways, directly by federal OSHA or under state programs. OSHA doesn’t cover self-employed individuals or immediate members of a farm family that don’t employ outside workers.

OSHA provides a comprehensive Website at osha.gov that includes sections dedicated to training, state programs, small business, construction, in addition to interactive eTools to assist employers and their employees.

OSHA also provides training programs to get hazard recognition for employers and their employees. Many states at the moment require training.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA TrainingThe Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Identifying Asbestos Insulation

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost 2020

When it comes to asbestos, it rarely needs introduced at this point. The majority of homeowners need to be educated on the general danger of breathing and disturbing asbestos fiber. Older buildings and homes may have asbestos within products from hot water piping insulation to furnace insulation, even floor tiles. Typically, it is recommended to simply leave it as-is without disturbing it. Otherwise, hire a professional asbestos removal company.

However, there are loose-fill wall and attic insulation which can contain asbestos. If you’re insulation is the batt style insulation, as the loose fill insulation has the higher risk as it’s loosely poured into wall or joist cavities. You may also find thousands of loose particles within walls or under attic flooring. These are the insulation types that pose the most risk.

So, how do you identify if your attic insulation contains asbestos? Below we will discuss specifics about loose fill insulation which could contain asbestos.

Vermiculite Attic Insulation

Vermiculite attic insulation is the main source of concern with asbestos dangers, although asbestos is not in every brand. Vermiculite insulation alone is not dangerous, being a pellet style mineral, which expands with higher temperatures. In addition to building insulation, vermiculite is commonly used with gardening for loosening soil.

More specifically, vermiculite insulation which was mined in Montana by the Libby company is one to watch for. It was sold under the brand Zonolite, for about 70 years.

Because Zonolite had been contaminated with tremolite, it resulted in being a health hazard. Tremolite is similar to asbestos. About 70% of U.S. vermiculite attic insulation originated from the Libby mine, while 30% came from other sources.

Loose Fill Insulation Could Contain Asbestos If:

Your home was constructed prior to 1990. The Libby mine was closed down in 1990, meaning any homes that were built and/or remodeled prior to their closing date could have attic insulation containing asbestos. If your home was constructed after their closing date, it reduces the chance of asbestos containing insulation, but there’s still a chance overstock insulation was used a while after closing.

  • Zonolilte is often a silver-gold or gray-brown color, which is another way to identify the insulation particles.
  • Zonolite particles have an accordion style texture. This texture is the result of particles puffing due to heat.
  • Zonolite will lay flat against a joist cavity, and remain firm. Loose fill fiberglass often fluffs and appears more like a snow drift.
  • Zonolite is a lightweight mineral, and reacts with high temperatures that result in puffing particles.

Is Loose Fill Soft, Gray and Lack Shine?

If this sounds like what you have, it is likely cellulose insulation, which contains a higher amount of recycled paper, without minerals. A closer inspection indicates this gray puffy material has no minerals, but appears like gray shredded paper. This means cellulose insulation does not contain asbestos and is a safe insulation, blown into the cavities.

Is Loose Fill Fluffy and White, With Some Shine?

If this sounds like what you have, it is likely fiberglass fill. Due to being a byproduct of glass, it has some shine in light. The texture is fluffy, similar to that of cotton candy. When it comes to breathing, fiberglass can be annoying, and known to cause cancer.

Is Loose Fill Puffy, Gray and Fibrous?

If this sounds like what you have, it is likely rock wool, a mineral based loose fill. It is commonly found in fiber bundles, with a cotton style look. Rock wool comes in brownish white, off white, or white. Rock wool insulation is fabricated from belted basaltic rock and dolomite, with binders being added. Raw materials get exposed to temperatures up to 2,750 degrees Fahrenheit, making it melt. Then, fibers are spun from the molten material. It is common for rock wool to be found as a woven insulation batt or loose insulation. Similar to fiberglass, it should be handled carefully, but rock wool is not known to cause cancer.

What To Do If I Suspect Zonolite Vermiculite Insulation?

If you have loose fill insulation in your wall or attic that fits the visual aspects above, you can verify if it contains asbestos with a DIY asbestos testing kit. If you would prefer not to be around the insulation, to be on the safe side a commercial firm can be hired for testing insulation for asbestos. Generally, DIY kits can be purchased under $50, which may be a cheaper route.

In the event you find your insulation contains asbestos, it is best to locate an abatement company that has professional experience in handling asbestos removal, and never disturb the insulation. Although, asbestos removal is expensive, but if left it could cause many health issues for you and/or your family.

Phoenix Valley Insulation Removal

If you’ve got asbestos insulation in your property it poses a health hazard.  Barrier insulation provides insulation removal services in the Phoenix Valley and is an insulation installation contractor.  That means we can remove dangerous, damaged, or ineffective insulation and replace it with the highest performance insulation on the market.  From spray foam insulation to loose fill blown in insulation we will help you choose a cost effective and high performance insulation solution to help keep you comfortable all year long.

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

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We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

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Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Brakepads

Asbestos In Brakepads

Asbestos is well known as a human carcinogen yet there are still materials containing asbestos in the USA and one of those products is often brake pads. read on to learn more.

Aftermarket Brakes

The majority of auto manufacturers haven’t installed asbestos-containing brake pads since the 1990’s due to health concerns for those that perform brake-related automotive repair or maintenance. And yet, asbestos-containing products are still used in the automotive aftermarket industry in the US, primarily due to high sales of low-cost, asbestos-containing brake parts from countries such as China and India.

Legal Proceedings

In 1989, the EPA proposed a ban on the manufacture, import, processing, and sale of asbestos-containing products to be phased out over seven years. But asbestos industry supporters challenged the ban. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the first stage of the EPA ban — prohibits new uses of asbestos, banned imported asbestos products, and ended the asbestos use in roofing and flooring felt, sheeting and tile, and clothing but id did not include several automotive parts in the ruling including brake pads.

Several initiatives have taken hold in some states such as California and Washington limiting the sale of brake pads containing asbestos. These initiatives have implications for the automotive brake parts aftermarket in North America, restraining future sales of low-cost imports from China and India, which are more likely to contain asbestos.  Replacement brake part sales in the US and Canada will see a shift in the product mix toward alternatives such as NAO brake pads and high-value, durable ceramic brake pads.

Source: https://www.freedoniagroup.com/Content/Blog/2017/05/22/Asbestos-in-Brake-Pads-What-the-Average-Consumer-Might-Not-Realize

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The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

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We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

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Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Appliances

Asbestos In Appliances

Products that once contained asbestos can be broadly divided into three ranges of products. Read on to learn more.

Handheld and Small Appliances

Handheld and smaller-than-a-breadbox sized items that had to be both lightweight and heat resistant often made it onto this list. Also, items that may have contained no major asbestos component may still have included asbestos electrical insulation in their cords or circuits.

  • Hairdryers
  • Toasters
  • Hotplates/Bunsen burners
  • Oven mitts and other heat resistant textiles
  • The wicks in lamps

Large and Installed Appliances

Larger appliances, including portable, free-standing, and installed products also could contain asbestos products as heat and electrical insulation and textiles.

  • Dishwashers
  • Ovens and stoves
  • Wood-burning stoves
  • Decorative fireplace logs
  • Ironing boards and their covers
  • Electrical blankets
  • Heaters
  • Crockpots and popcorn poppers

Talcum and Vermiculite Products

It’s important to remember that asbestos is a naturally-occurring mineral that is mined. While this silica-based mineral only forms under certain circumstances, it can also form in or near other minerals, potentially contaminating them. Both talcum (talc powder) and vermiculite both can be contaminated, and before testing was done to make sure these minerals were screened, both could be contaminated by asbestos.

Source: https://fibercontrolinc.com/types-of-appliances-that-contain-asbestos

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The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

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Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Older Buildings Health Risks

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost 2020

The world famous Cleveland Clinic have published a very good layman’s guide to asbestos in other buildings – including the associated health risks and how to protect your family from exposure. You can read the entire article here.

Pulmonologist Humberto Choi, MD, says it was also used in shipbuilding and construction to make cements and plastics stronger. “Before it was banned, asbestos could be found in ceilings, floors and paint because it was fireproof, he says. “It was sometimes even used in crayons.”

Risks

“The concern is regular exposure,” says Dr. Choi. “People who work in the construction, shipbuilding and mining industries are at risk. They can also bring asbestos home on their shoes, clothing or even in their hair. That can put their families at risk.”

People who work in these industries should do the following:

  • Use protective equipment provided by your employer while at work
  • Always shower immediately after work
  • Always remove and wash your clothes right way

Also, it’s a good idea to check what is in products you buy from other countries. Although there are restrictions on using asbestos in the U.S., that’s not the case everywhere. “If you’re getting products from another country, you may not know they contain asbestos,” Dr. Choi says.

Asbestos Exposure Symptoms

  • Shortness of breath
  • Wheezing
  • Chronic cough
  • Chest pain
  • Swelling in the face
  • Difficulty swallowing

“Asbestos-related diseases can take decades to show up, and whether or not you develop a disease depends on how long you were exposed and how intense that exposure was,” Dr. Choi says. If you have these symptoms or suspect asbestos exposure, talk to your doctor.

Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

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We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

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Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In The News

Asbestos In The News

On May 15, 2020, the non-partisan Environmental Working Group issued a press release stating asbestos has been discovered in eye shadow kits that are talc based. Read on to learn more. The entire press release can be read here.

Laboratory tests performed by the Scientific Analytical Institute of Greensboro, NC or behalf of the Environmental Working Group found up to approximately 3.9 million asbestos fiber structures per single gram of Jmkcoz brand eye shadow that is marketed and sold on Amazon. Of the 45 shades they tested, no less than 40 were discovered to contain asbestos.

Further tests discovered more asbestos in a second Jmkcoz product, the Beauty Glazed Gorgeous Me Eye Shadow Tray Palette, where asbestos was found a ta rate of 3.5 million asbestos fiber structures per single gram. Twenty percent of the twenty-five shade on offer through Ebay and Amazon were found to contain asbestos.

“We urge anyone who has purchased either of these products for themselves, family or friends to take the necessary steps to ensure they are no longer being used,” said Tasha Stoiber, Ph.D., a senior scientist at the Environmental Working Group. “And we call on these companies and online retailers to immediately pull both of these products from their respective websites. Asbestos, even at the smallest levels of exposure, can cause serious harm – even death – later in life.”

The press release from the Environmental Working Group also states similar discoveries from the recent past:

  • In January, similar lab tests commissioned by EWG found asbestos in a talc-containing children’s toy makeup set.
  • In October 2019, Johnson & Johnson issued a voluntary recall of its baby powder after the Food and Drug Administration found trace levels of asbestos in samples of the popular product.
  • In March 2019, the FDA issued a rare alert, urging consumers to stop using certain cosmetics products from the national retailer Claire’s, after the agency found the deadly carcinogen asbestos in at least three different talc-based products.
  • The FDA issued a similar safety alert in September after the agency found asbestos in at least four different talc-based products marketed by Beauty Plus.
  • In 2015, EWG Action Fund, EWG’s 501(c)(4) sister organization, found asbestos fibers in several brands of children’s crayons and toy crime scene investigation kits.
  • In 2007, tests commissioned by the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization also found the lethal fiber in a toy fingerprint kit named after the television show “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.”
  • In 2000, an investigation by journalists from the Seattle Post Intelligencer discovered asbestos in imported crayons made with talc.

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The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

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We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

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Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

How Is Asbestos Dangerous?

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost 2020

Asbestos fibers  most often enter the body is through breathing . Several of the fibers become trapped in the mucous membranes of the throat and nose where they can then be removed, but some can get into the lungs, or, if swallowed, into the digestive tract. Asbestos is most hazardous when it is friable, meaning it is easily crumbled by hand, releasing fibers into the air. Sprayed on asbestos insulation is highly friable.  Asbestos-containing ceiling tiles, floor tiles, undamaged laboratory cabinet tops, shingles, fire doors, siding shingles, etc. will not release asbestos fibers unless they are disturbed or damaged in some way.

Asbestosis

Asbestosis is a serious, chronic, non-cancerous respiratory disease. Inhaled asbestos fibers aggravate lung tissues, which cause them to scar. Symptoms of asbestosis include shortness of breath and a dry crackling sound in the lungs while inhaling.  There is no effective treatment for asbestosis; the disease is usually disabling or fatal. Those who renovate or demolish buildings that contain asbestos may be at significant risk, depending on the nature of the exposure and precautions taken.

Lung Cancer

Lung cancer causes the largest number of deaths related to asbestos exposure. The incidence of lung cancer in people who are directly involved in the mining, milling, manufacturing and use of asbestos and its products is much higher than in the general population.  People who have been exposed to asbestos and are also exposed to some other carcinogen — such as cigarette smoke — have a significantly greater risk of developing lung cancer than people who have only been exposed to asbestos.

Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer that most often occurs in the thin membrane lining of the lungs, chest, abdomen, and (rarely) heart. About 200 cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. Virtually all cases of mesothelioma are linked with asbestos exposure. Approximately 2 percent of all miners and textile workers who work with asbestos, and 10 percent of all workers who were involved in the manufacture of asbestos-containing gas masks, contract mesothelioma. People who work in asbestos mines, asbestos mills and factories, and shipyards that use asbestos, as well as people who manufacture and install asbestos insulation, have an increased risk of mesothelioma. So do people who live with asbestos workers, near asbestos mining areas, near asbestos product factories or near shipyards where use of asbestos has produced large quantities of airborne asbestos fibers.

Source: https://ehs.oregonstate.edu/asb-when

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The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

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Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos Around The House

Asbestos Around The House

Window and door seals

Asbestos can be found in caulk or sealant products which are placed on windows and doors. The material’s heat resistance is suitable to keeping temperate air from passing through the sealant. Caulk with asbestos was also once used to increase the efficiency of gasket seals found in furnace doors. Apart from high heat resistance, the caulk is also able to create a tight pressure seal.

Property insulation

Asbestos is mostly used as an insulating material in homes built before the 90s. The material can keep the heat from escaping the house. It is also able to efficiently block a lot of noise. Asbestos insulation is often placed between walls and in ceilings.

Concrete or wood adhesion

Before the 1980s, asbestos was used in many adhesion products to secure wooden or concrete materials in place. This is due to the tensile strength of the asbestos fibres, which ensures anything attached to it is secure. This type of adhesion can be found in floors, walls and ceilings.

Vintage furniture

Asbestos was often used in furniture between the 1930s and ‘60s. The material was used in chairs to provide a cushioning support. Couches with springs installed inside them may have asbestos within the underside. Furniture with this hazardous material weaved into it are often dyed in gold or silver. Asbestos stuffing and woven fabrics have a fibrous quality when seen up close.

Source: https://www.asbestosremovalsaustralia.com.au/blog/common-place-asbestos/

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The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

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Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In The News

Asbestos Cooling Towers

Asbestos has been making the news lately. The EPA has concluded asbestos exposure poses an “unreasonable” risk in many cases. Read on to learn more from the report at the very respected chemistryworld.com

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has concluded that commercial and consumer uses of asbestos present an ‘unreasonable risk’ to human health, in a new draft risk evaluation mandated under the updated Toxic Substances Control Act that governs America’s chemical policy. The agency found that workers, consumers and bystanders could be harmed by exposure to asbestos under certain conditions.

The EPA said health risks – including cancers – were increased from exposures in the chlor-alkali industry, as well as use of oil field brake blocks, aftermarket automotive brakes or linings and other vehicle friction products. In its review, the agency did not evaluate asbestos exposure hazards to the general population, or the risks posed by legacy asbestos products.

The American Chemistry Council (ACC) took issue with the EPA’s preliminary findings, saying the agency failed to recognize the chlorine industry’s ‘long history of safe use’. While the EPA acknowledges that personal protective equipment (PPE) is effective, it appears to rely on ‘inaccurate assumptions that overestimate exposure risks for certain chlor-alkali workers’, the ACC argued. The chemical industry trade group emphasized that facilities using chrysotile asbestos diaphragms during the chlor-alkali manufacturing process adhere to established safety protocols – including engineering controls, training, as well as PPE – to minimize worker exposure to asbestos.

The EPA’s report is not final and is subject to public comment and also peer review by independent scientific experts. Almost a year ago, the agency was heavily criticized for a new policy that, rather than banning asbestos outright, required that manufacturers notify the agency and seek its approval before resuming use of the carcinogen. In 2018, the agency also proposed a framework to permit the approval for ‘new uses’ of products containing asbestos on a case-by-case basis.

Source: https://www.chemistryworld.com/news/us-agency-concludes-asbestos-exposure-poses-unreasonable-risk-in-many-cases/4011464.article

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

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Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

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Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

COVID-19 And Asbestos Related Diseases

COVID-19 And Asbestos Related Diseases

COVID-19 is a respiratory illness which can range in severity from person to person from mild infections to much more serious. Those most at risk of serious infections include:

  • People over 70
  • People under 70 with underlying health conditions (including respiratory illnesses)
  • People with compromised immune systems (such as people who have cancer)
  • Pregnant women

It’s therefore no surprise that those who are suffering from an asbestos related illness are concerned of infection.

Keeping Safe

It’s important to follow the guidance which has already been issued in the meantime, which includes:

  • Significantly limit your face-to-face interactions with friends and family and avoid contact with anyone displaying symptoms.
  • Avoid using public transport and stay at home where possible, avoiding public places such as cinemas, theaters etc.
  • Ask family, friends and neighbors to help you when you need supplies such as food and medicine, to avoid going out.
  • You can also use online services for supplies.
  • Make sure you wash your hands regularly with soap and water or hand sanitizer, avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve when you cough or sneeze and ensure you throw the tissue immediately in the bin and wash your hands.

Self Isolation Coping Mechanisms

  • Exercise – You can also take a walk, providing you stay at least 6 feet away from anyone else. The fresh air can often be good for your mental well-being.
  • Hobbies – Try to find things to do which you enjoy, whether that be reading, writing, watching TV or cooking.
  • Natural light – If it’s a sunny day, open your windows, let some natural light in and even go out into the garden if you can.
  • Keep in touch with friends and family – Although social distancing means you’ll be avoiding regular visitors, make sure you keep in touch with them by phone, text, Skype, etc. Being able to talk to others and share experiences is not only important for your own mental well being, but also for those you’re talking too. It’s in this hour of need we need to rely on others and keep each other safe.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

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Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Non-Occupational Exposure To Asbestos

Non Occupational Exposure To Asbestos

Mesothelioma is a dangerous and rare form of cancer and so far, it is only known to be caused by asbestos exposure. It affects the mesothelial cells situated in the area of the lungs and abdomen, causing them to turn into cancerous cells and develop a tumor. However, people can also succumb to it through non-occupational exposure to asbestos. read on to learn more.

Domestic Exposure

Work clothing brings asbestos dust  and fibers into the homes of people.

Asbestos Containing Products

Examples of this would include spackle, brakes, floor tiles, clutches and other materials used around the home.

Environmental Exposure

This can take a toll on people living near refineries, factories and other places where items are made containing asbestos.

Non-occupational exposure happens at home as a result of the fact that asbestos can be present almost everywhere. Even so, some people are more predisposed to asbestos-related health problems than others.

Other ways asbestos can be harmful include:

Clothing

Those working in launderettes present a higher risk of developing mesothelioma if they come into contact with the clothes of people who work with asbestos.

Furniture

Asbestos fibers can be transferred through pieces of furniture like couches, beds, chairs or carpets if the workers do not remove their asbestos-contaminated clothes before sitting down.

Hugging

Early exposure of children can lead to the development of lung diseases in their late childhood or early adult life.

Soil Dust

Unpaved roads can lead to dust release into the air, which might put children at risk of asbestos exposure while playing outside the house in dirt. Excessive quarry emissions, building new houses and other ordinary activities such as gardening are just another means of accidentally inhaling asbestos fibers. Once these fibers reach the interior of the house, they can be air transported through household activities. This is why it is essential to know that vacuuming is not helpful in removing the asbestos fibers as they are very small and can pass through the texture of the vacuum cleaner bags.

Mesothelioma

Asbestos exposure is highly dependent on the type of fibers and the most concerned asbestos-related disease is mesothelioma. For instance, chrysotile is considered a weak cancer-causing agent as it can be dissolved by enzymes, unlike other types of asbestos such as crocidolite. Studies have also shown that the probability of developing mesothelioma is also influenced by the exposure period: the longer the exposure, the higher the risk of experiencing health problems. Moreover, a minimal lower limit of safe asbestos exposure has not been proven to exist.

Smoking

It is well-known that smoking leads to an increase of the risk of being affected by lung diseases after asbestos exposure. Smokers are part of the group who is the most predisposed to developing lung cancer, asbestosis or mesothelioma.

Asbestos Home Removal

The location of asbestos is very important when it comes to asbestos cleanup. Removing asbestos from homes, schools and any other commercial buildings is a quite difficult task. Removal of asbestos is a complex process and should only be done by qualified contractors who underwent a special training. If not done correctly, asbestos removal can be very dangerous. Also, keep in mind that in order to remove asbestos from homes, most of the states require an application process.

Source: https://www.asbestos123.com/news/non-occupational-exposure-to-asbestos/

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

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Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Ten Places You Can Find Asbestos

Asbestos Around The House

Asbestos can be found in many unexpected places. Here are ten spots where asbestos may be found where you may not realize it. read on to learn more.

Seals And Sealants

Asbestos was often used in caulking in windows and doors until the 1970’s. It was also used on furnace doors, gasket seals, old coal chutes and other heat resistant areas.

Bowling Balls

Bowling balls can last for decades. And while most modern bowling balls are not made with asbestos, that perfect nine-pound, magenta bowling ball you chose at the bowling alley may actually be an older, asbestos-filled one.

Siding And Roofing

Most cement or asphalt composites used in roofing and siding are generally considered nonfriable, but those with a large paper make up are friable because they come apart with pressure. Both types release breathable particles of asbestos when cutting into or removed by tearing and pose a health hazard.

Talcum Powder

This seemingly harmless substance is raising red flags because of a dangerous risk of asbestos exposure. The connection between talc and asbestos involves the close proximity of the two minerals on the earth’s surface, which often results in contamination.

Ducts And Pipes

Old systems of steam piping and even some hot water plumbing are wrapped in asbestos-containing “blankets” that pose a serious risk when removed or cut without the help of a professional who uses protective measures to dampen the release of particles.

Crayons

Through independent tests, asbestos fibers were found in four of the 28 boxes of crayons tested, and two of the 21 crime-scene fingerprint kits.

Books And Bindings

“Fahrenheit 451” has a notorious past for being bound with asbestos in hopes the book would never be burned.  It is not the first time book bindings contained asbestos. In fact, reports show bookbinders were exposed to asbestos in the mid-1900’s.

Ceiling Tiles

Obvious forms of asbestos ceiling tiles are the 9 by 9 inch (22.86 by 22.86 cm) or 12 by 12 inches (30.48 by 30.48 cm) white or off-white panels held up in a grid system. Adding or removing a tile involves pushing it up from the grid frame and angling it down and out or up and in place. Basements in homes, in particular, might feature the tiles because of their soundproof qualities and low cost. It’s estimated that 5 to 10 percent of the ceiling tiles in the U.S. contain asbestos.

Wallpaper

Removing layers of old paper that have hung in there, adhering to walls for decades, is a remodeling project of major proportions. It involves lots of time and elbow grease. In homes papered before 1980, it can even be downright dangerous to undertake wallpaper removal because many vinyl papers before that time contain asbestos

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

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Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Guttering

Asbestos In Guttering

Originally used because of its great strength, asbestos was used in many construction projects over the decades as it was malleable and resistant to heat. Of course, it was later discovered when asbestos fibers come into contact with air and is inhaled by humans, it greatly increases the risk of mesothelioma, lung cancer, and asbestosis. However, did you know you can also find asbestos in your gutters? read on to learn more.

Hypothesis

It is generally agreed asbestos appears in guttering from having bene present in another part of the rood. Over the decades asbestos was used in asphalt, floor tiles, and furnace insulation as well as roofing shingles.

Realistically it is unlikely you will need to think about this issue. In the US, asbestos has been banned from the majority of house building products for decades, however, older buildings may contain it. It was used in wall insulation from 1930 to 1950 and was in attic insulation until 1990 and was in textured paint and patching compounds until 1977.

Asbestos In Your Home?

Should you have asbestos in your home it is vitally important you do not remove it. Contractors need a special license from the EPA to both handle and remove asbestos. The material crumbles and separates releasing health-damaging asbestos fibers into the air.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Nature

Asbestos In Nature

In reality, “asbestos” is a legal and commercial term that describes a specific group of silicate materials forming long bundles of very thin and lengthy mineral fibers. Read on to learn more about asbestos in nature.

Asbestos is most commonly found in three rock types: serpentinites, altered ultramafic rocks, and some mafic rocks. Other rock types known to host asbestos include metamorphosed dolostones, metamorphosed iron formations, carbonatites, and alkalic intrusions. Contributing to asbestos formation is the faulting and fracturing of these rocks with increased temperatures, pressures, and the presence of water. The amount of asbestos or asbestiform minerals in these rocks can range in size from commercial-grade ore bodies to thin impure veinlets or low-grade occurrences. Asbestos can be released from these rocks if the rocks are broken or crushed. Asbestos can also be released from asbestos-containing soils that are stirred up. The presence and prevalence of asbestos fibers in soils overlaying rocks containing asbestos is not known and needs to be evaluated.

What are the known locations of Naturally Occurring Asbestos?

The history of asbestos discovery and usage is at least 5,000 years old. In the United States, the prospecting and identification of asbestos began in the mid to late 1800s. The US Geological Survey, in 2006 and 2007, completed literature reviews of the known locations of naturally occurring asbestos in the Eastern USExternal , Central USExternal , and Rocky Mountain US StatesExternal . Information about the western US States is available at USGS at (Mineral Resources On-line Spatial DataExternal ).

ATSDR combined these data sets into two single maps, which can be viewed below:

  • US Cdc-pdf[PDF – 1 MB]
    This map highlights the top 100 fastest growing counties within the contiguous United States and Alaska and the location of naturally occurring asbestos.
  • Georgia Cdc-pdf[PDF – 2 MB]
    This map depicts the 100 fastest growing US counties in north Georgia in relation to the locations of naturally occurring asbestos and ultramafic rocks which are known to host asbestos.

Can Naturally Occurring Asbestos become a Health Problem?

Naturally occurring asbestos is only a health problem if it is disturbed. Asbestos is made up of fibers that are so small you cannot see them. If asbestos fibers are in the air you breathe, you might get asbestos fibers in your lungs. Breathing in the fibers is the primary way that people are exposed to asbestos.

The US Cdc-pdf[PDF – 1 MB] and Georgia Cdc-pdf[PDF – 2 MB] maps show the known locations of naturally occurring asbestos in the United States and provide an indicator of areas that may be more prone to surface soil disturbance.

The two indicators these maps define are listed below:

  • Increase in the number of homes by housing starts
  • Increase in population by the 100 fastest-growing counties

Source: https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/noa/where_is_asbestos_found.html

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Types Of Asbestos

Types Of Asbestos

In reality, “asbestos” is a legal and commercial term covering many different minerals, but the following are considered to be asbestos. Read on to learn more.

Chrysotile

Chrysotile is the most common asbestos. Found in walls, roofs, ceilings as well as floors. It also has applications is the automobile industry for boiler seats, gaskets, brake linings and insulation for appliances, ducts, and pipes.

Amosite

Amosite was used in pipe insulation and sheets of cement and can also be discovered in ceiling tiles, thermal insulation products, and insulating board.

Crocidolite

This was often used in the insulation of steam engines as well as plastics, pipe insulation, cement products, and spray-on coatings.

Anthophyllite

Anthophyllite was used for construction and insulation products. It also appears in chrysolite asbestos, talc, and vermiculite.

All Asbestos Dangerous?

All identified forms of asbestos can cause cancers, mesothelioma as well as other significant and serious diseases. he Health Protection Agency in the U.K., claim amphibole varieties of asbestos are the most dangerous forms. Meanwhile, The EPA has abandoned projects aiming to identify which asbestos fiber types are the most toxic.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Kitchens

Asbestos In Kitchens

When you are renovating your kitchen you should be aware of serious health and safety concerns as you may be exposed to asbestos and this can cause harm to yourself as well as those living in the same house as you. This is why you need to test materials for asbestos.

Look at the following areas prior to the outset of the renovation.

  • Splash-backs – the glue used for the splash-back and/or the tile may contain asbestos.
  • Kitchen Tiles –9″ vinyl or asphalt-based floor tiles, 12” vinyl tiles and sheet linoleum made prior to 1990.
  • Kitchen Tile Adhesive – the glue used for kitchen flooring materials.
  • Hot water insulation – asbestos coatings used to insulate hot water.
  • Ducting – moving or replacing ducting work – check for tape at the joints as some may contain asbestos.
  • Drywall – you’ll need to have the drywall tested before disposal or removal as it may contain asbestos
  • Ceramic Tile – Underlay sheeting for ceramic tiles may contain asbestos.
  • Ceilings – including drop ceiling, popcorn ceiling, and plaster may contain asbestos.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Auto Repair, Brakes And Clutches

Asbestos In Auto Repair Brakes And Clutches.

Asbestos has been a component in linings, clutch facings, and brakes pads for a long time and millions of them on the shelf of an auto parts store or operating in vehicles can still be found today. That said they are not normally used in the production of new components. Read on to learn more.

Hazards

As clutches and brakes wear down through regular usage, dust containing asbestos is released into the outside environment as well as getting trapped within the vehicle housing to be released when those areas are being worked on. Asbestos dust is also spread further by using a vacuum cleaner to sweep up the break residue and in a similar way to use compressed air.

Therefore, it should be obvious that mechanics are at high risk for asbestos exposure. Cleaning drum brakes can release asbestos fibers by the million around the face of a mechanic, even striking a brake drum with an object like a hammer can cause the release of asbestos fibers.  It can get on their hands and be swallowed as well. Asbestos lingers once it is in the air and can be inhaled by customers as well as mechanics. Not to mention the dust will remain on their clothes, endangering other people they may meet.

Minimizing Dangers

Government regulations state any shop that does in excess of five brake jobs per year must use special equipment so asbestos exposure is minimized. These include a see-through enclosure surrounding the brake system and a vacuum with a HEPA filter. Another method is low-pressure sprays used to wet down the brake assembly and the water runoff when collected. Asbestos must also be collected and sealed as well as labeled in containers that cannot be opened.

The Home Mechanic

As home auto mechanics are still a very popular pastime those who work with clutches and brakes containing asbestos are also at risk and the problem may even be more intense as they do not often have the safety equipment found in auto shops.

The SPA states at home mechanics should refrain from using compressed air to clean brakes to prevent the release of asbestos and should also use parts that are preground to avoid asbestos exposure.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos And Commercial Buildings

Asbestos Cooling Towers

Originally workers involved in maritime work, manufacturing and building trades were exposed to the effects of asbestos. The effects of these included mesothelioma, lung cancer, and asbestosis. However, exposure to asbestos in the above areas is very different than the exposure for the potential for people who occupy commercial buildings with asbestos-containing building materials, known as ACBM’s – these can be defined as buildings that contain asbestos at a rate of greater than one percent.

ACBM’s needed to be managed properly and this meant the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) has to establish and specify work practices so asbestos release would be minimized when demolition and renovation activities take place. This means there are various rules and practices that have to be followed under what is known as the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations – and these must be strictly adhered too.

ACBM’s can be managed in place by drafting and implementing an Asbestos Operations and Maintenance Plan (O&M Plan), which identifies the type, location as well as the condition of all ACBM’s.

This plan needs to be available for review by everyone involved in the maintenance and renovation of a building. by sticking to this plan, it will prevent exposure to asbestos and also ensure any activities are performed in a way that minimizes the potential health hazards.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.