Secondary Asbestos Exposure

Secondary Asbestos Exposure

It sounds like something from an Orwellian nightmare but it may be possible that thanks to secondary asbestos exposure every time kissed or hugged a loved one you are inadvertently exposing them to a toxin so deadly, the US Government classifies it as a Group One carcinogen.

Although decades have passed since asbestos was used in construction, asbestos dust is still causing dreaded cancer, mesothelioma, today.

A National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) report from over twenty years ago stated exposure to asbestos in a domestic setting still poses an increased risk of diseases. Women, in their traditional household role, have been exposed to asbestos dust for decades and suffering from mesothelioma, essentially a death sentence from breathing in the dust from their family’s work clothing. Dust was also shared from skin to skin contact and from hair as well as from laundering the clothes in washing machines.

If that is not bad enough just because a partner showed their affection you may have developed mesothelioma. Truly one of the most tragic ways one can be exposed to this deadly mineral.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Is Asbestos In Your Walls?

Is Asbestos In Your Walls

Right until the end of the 1970’s asbestos was a common component in the manufacturing of drywall in the United States. So, if you are planning on some demolition work, remember if the building you are working on was built prior to 1980, it may well contain asbestos. Asbestos exposure may cause scarring of the tissue in your lungs and abdomen and cause difficulty berating as well as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Mesothelioma is an especially cruel and painful kind of cancer with no cure. Read on to learn more.

Paneling And Drywall

If your building was built after 1930 here is a fair chance part of it is made from drywall. Although it was not common for these to contain asbestos fiber, the heavier duty cement boards used often did as well as paneling designed for decorative purposes. As a rule of thumbs, panels containing asbestos are not usually harm causing so long as they are still in one solid piece with no breaks or fractures.

When replacing vintage paneling that may contain asbestos, remove it in one piece. Do not break it up as this will expose you to asbestos. Remember as the boards age they become increasingly brittle and their removal may cause very small asbestos fibers to go across the room where they can be ingested and breathed in. However, you can cover the older wall panels with another treatment to the surface – this will be ok as long as you no longer drill through to the wall covering.

Joint Compounds

Regardless of whether there is asbestos in the drywall of your home, wall-joint compound, also commonly known as sheetrock mud manufactured for forty years from 1940 onwards did contain asbestos. It was utilized to fuse the seams between the panels of drywall once they were installed.

Remarkably this was commonly sold in hardware stores either as a paste in a can or bucket or as a dry pounder with a five pound or twenty-five pound sack. Obviously using this exposed people to asbestos and must be treated with great caution now.

 

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Worrying about Asbestos In Your Home?

Worrying about Asbestos In Your Home?

Widely used for nearly the entire twentieth century, asbestos is now banned in excess of fifty countries. So, should you be concerned if it is discovered in your home?

In The Home

You can often find asbestos in the duct system of older homes. Especially when a white-colored tape has been used. Other areas you may find it include. patching compounds, textured paint, embers in gas-powered fireplaces, ashes that are artificial, siding, roofing, walla and attics containing vermiculite insulation and tiles for floors and ceilings.

Health Problems

Mesothelioma, lung cancer, and asbestosis are the results of inhaling asbestos into your lungs causing inflammation and tumors. Asbestosis is characterized by inflammation, breath shortness, and coughing, mesothelioma is a kind of cancer of the membrane around the lungs while lung cancer is well known because so many die from it every year. as per the World health organization, in excess of 100,000 people die from these diseases per annum and many others die from diseases that are asbestos-related or suffer varying levels of disability and a decrease in their quality of life as a result.

What Risk Do You Have?

Many, perhaps most homes built before 1980 contain asbestos. However, those who suffer from asbestos-related conditions usually fall into one of the following:

  • Asbestos mine, mill, or transportation workers
  • Asbestos product workers
  • Families of asbestos workers
  • People who live near asbestos mines or mills

When there is Asbestos In Your Home?

If you see white tapes on your ducts it should be fine as long as it is not tampered with and likewise for vermiculite insulation in your attic. Remember you can always call an asbestos inspection company to test the material and decide what to do next from there.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost

Cost of Asbestos Removal Popcorn Ceiling

How much does it cost to remove a popcorn ceiling? You can expect to pay about $4 per sq. ft. on average or $1 to $3 per sq. ft. for popcorn ceiling removal that may or may not contain asbestos.

According to ImproveNet, popcorn ceiling removal costs about $1.50 per sq. ft. with average prices ranging from $1 to $2 per sq. ft. to remove a popcorn ceiling not containing asbestos in the US for 2019. Most homeowners spent around $1,565.  Homeguide states a similar prices range with “most home spending an average range of $2,700 for a 1,800 sq. ft. home” and average prices ranging from $1,010 to $2,260. You can expect to pay even more for the cost of asbestos popcorn ceiling removal.

Cost of Asbestos Removal Popcorn Ceiling

How much does it cost to remove asbestos from a popcorn ceiling? If your popcorn ceiling tests positive for asbestos, you can contain or encapsulate the asbestos for a cost of $2 to $6 per sq. ft. or hire an asbestos removal contractor to remove asbestos for about $10 to $20 per sq. ft. according to HomeGuide. On average, asbestos removal from a popcorn ceiling costs about $2,000, with prices ranging from $1,500 to $2,500 in the US for 2019.

Popcorn Ceiling vs Asbestos Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost

CostHelper says Popcorn ceilings not containing asbestos can expect to pay about $1 to $3 per square foot or $250 to $900 to remove a popcorn ceiling from a 15’x20’ room or $1,200 to $1,400 for a 1,6000 sq. ft house.

Popcorn ceiling containing asbestos can expect to pay about $3 to $7 per square foot $900 to $2,100 to remove a popcorn ceiling from a 15’x20’ room or $4,500 to $11,500 for a 1,6000 sq. ft house.

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost Factors

Learn more about the cost factors that affect popcorn ceiling removal.

Asbestos Testing. A simple asbestos test will cost you anywhere from $50 to $100.

Ceiling Size. The size of your ceiling makes a difference in the cost. Most asbestos removal contractors charge anywhere from $1 to $3 per sq. ft. or $15 to $40 per hour according to HomeAdvisor.

Moving Furniture. Furniture will need to be moved in order to remove the popcorn ceiling. Furniture removal usually only adds about $100 or so to the overall cost.

Asbestos Removal. If asbestos is found in your popcorn ceiling it will cost more to remove.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements

OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements 2

According to EPA.gov, OSHA now requires employers to establish and continue participation in an asbestos training program for employees that might be exposed to fiber levels that are either anticipated or measured at/above permissible exposure limits. OSHA training programs consist of initial classroom training and annual online refresher courses.

Permissible exposure limits are 0.1 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc) as an 8-hour, time-weighted average (TWA) and/or the excursion limit of 1.0 f/cc as a 30-minute time-weighted average (TWA).

See the full list of OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements (PDF)

See the full list of EPA AHERA Requirements (PDF)

Find your Local & State Asbestos Training Requirements

Employee Information & Training Requirements

According to OSHA Training Requirements,

  1. The employer must train every employee who will be exposed to airborne asbestos concentrations at/or above the PEL and/or excursion limit. The employer must establish and continue an on-going asbestos training program and ensure employee participation in the program.
  2. Training must be provided at the time/prior to the initial assignment and one time per year thereafter.
  3. The training program must be conducted in a way in which the employee is easily able to understand.
  4. The employer must also provide asbestos awareness training courses to employees who perform housekeeping work in an area that contains PACM or ACM. The asbestos awareness training course must contain the following elements: locations of PACM and ACM in the facility/building, health effects of asbestos, requirements relating to housekeeping, recognition of PACM and ACM damage and deterioration, and proper response to fiber release episodes, to all employees who perform housekeeping work in areas where PACM and/or ACM is present. Each such employee must be so trained at least one time per year.
  5. Employer must provide information and training materials
  6. Employer must keep records of training for up to one year after the employee’s last of employment.

Types of OSHA Asbestos Training

There are 3 types of OSHA Asbestos Training including:

  1. Awareness Training
  2. Special O&M Training
  3. Abatement Worker Training

Who Can Give OSHA Asbestos Training?

The (APM) asbestos program manager could conduct asbestos training programs for types one and two if they have specific asbestos training and knowledge. If not the APM then the builder owner must send workers or hire an outside consultant to teach the O&M training course. A trained and accredited asbestos professional or a trained industrial hygienist must conduct respirator use and fit-test training. Training on health effects must be conducted by a health professional. Type three training can only be conducted by an entity who’s training course(s) are approved by a state with an EPA approved MAP or by the EPA.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

How Much Does Asbestos Removal Cost?

How Much Does Asbestos Removal Cost?

On average, asbestos removal costs about $1,895. Asbestos removal prices ranged from $1,093 to $2,717 in the US for 2019. Whole-home asbestos removal costs can range anywhere from $15,000 to $30,000 depending on setup.

Cost of Asbestos Inspection

A preliminary asbestos inspection costs $400 to $800. The follow-up inspection when the project is completed adds anywhere from $200 to $400 according to HouseLogic. To get lab work done, a sample sent for testing averages from $25 to $75.

Average Asbestos Removal Costs

Asbestos removal cost varies depending on how extensive the work that needs to be done is. A lot of contractors have a minimum fee of $1,500 to $3,000, even if the project is small.

Complete removal in a 1,500-square-foot house with asbestos in the walls, ceilings, roof, floors, attic, pipes, and basement— costs could reach as high as $20,000 to $30,000. Sealing the area with asbestos is the most expensive responsible for nearly 65% of the total bill.

Asbestos is a carcinogen that was used abundantly in building materials before the 1970s. It’s typically found as pipe and duct insulation, wall and ceiling acoustical tiles, vermiculite attic insulation, floor tiles (and their adhesives), cement asbestos siding.

Don’t let that scare you, though. If the asbestos-containing materials in your home are not damaged, you can leave them alone. It’s a lot more dangerous to disturb them, says the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In a lot of states, you are required to divulge the presence of any asbestos to potential buyers of your home.

Having said that, if you plan on doing remodeling that will disturb the materials, total removal of them is the best option.

  • Asbestos Ceiling Tile Removal Cost

Removal of ceiling tiles costs around $5 and $15 per square foot. Popcorn ceilings or acoustic ceilings with a specialty thick sealant for between $2 and $6 per square foot. If your ceiling comes back negative for asbestos, the removal of popcorn ceilings cost $1,600 on average.

  • Average Asbestos Cleanup Costs in Ducts

Licensed professionals will include the cost of cleaning ducts if they removed asbestos from the ductwork. Test and inspect the ducts prior to regular cleanings. Costs will vary depending on the shape, length, accessibility, and type of duct system you have.

  • Asbestos Flooring & Floor Tile Removal Cost

Average cost of removing asbestos from flooring is about $5 to $15 per square foot. Floor tiles and the mastic used to glue them down requires mechanical removal. Almost all tile remediation only requires you encapsulate it and then directly cover it with new flooring. Installing new flooring will cost from $1,500 to $4,500.

  • Asbestos Pipe Insulation & Wrap Removal

In addition to the setup fees of $2.50 to $10 per square foot, the removal of pipe wrap runs an additional $2 to $5 per linear foot. Difficult to access areas can increase the cost further.

Asbestos Removal Hourly Labor Cost

According to HomeAdvisor, “On average, you’ll pay $75 to $200 per hour for labor per crew member. It takes a two-person crew an average of 8 hours to complete a typical project with a cost of $1,200 to $3,200.

Asbestos Removal Costs Per Square Foot

Asbestos removal costs per square ft range from $10 to $20 per sq. ft. on average according to HomeGuide.

  • Ceiling Tile: $2 to $15 per sq. ft.
  • Floor Tile: $5 to $15 per sq. ft.
  • Pipe Insulation & Wrap Removal: $2 to $10 per sq. ft.
  • Roof: $20 to $120 per sq. ft.
  • Drywall or Wall: $2 to $6 per sq. ft.

Asbestos Removal Basics

It’s a two-step process. First, the material needs to be tested to guarantee it contains asbestos. If it does come back containing asbestos, have it removed professionally. Here’s what you will need to know:

Contact your state asbestos administrative department as well as your regional asbestos program as or your Occupational Safety and Health Administration regional office to find out more about your local regulations and requirements.

Find certified asbestos inspectors and contractors that are trained and licensed in safe asbestos testing and removal.

To stay away from a conflict of interests, have suspected materials tested by one company and removal or abatement completed by a different one.

Prepare yourself–in some cases, you and your family might have to relocate temporarily while the asbestos is being removed.

Hiring a Corrective-Action Contractor

It’s okay to hire flooring, roofing, and siding contractors that could be exempt from state asbestos removal licensing provisions, just as long as they’re trained in asbestos removal. The EPA offers recommendations on what to do if you hire a corrective-action contractor.

Before work starts, you will want a written contract that undeniably states all federal, state, and local guidelines that the contractor is required to follow, like the cleanup of your property and disposal of the asbestos.

When the job is finished, acquire written proof from the contractor that every procedure was followed correctly. Have a follow-up inspection from a licensed asbestos inspector.

Sources:

  1. Walker, Jan Soults. “Asbestos Removal: Caution and Costs.” HouseLogic, HouseLogic, 18 Sept. 2018, https://www.houselogic.com/organize-maintain/home-maintenance-tips/asbestos-removal/.
  2. Learn How Much It Costs to Remove Asbestos.” HomeAdvisor, https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/environmental-safety/remove-asbestos/.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars