Types Of Asbestos

Types Of Asbestos

In reality, “asbestos” is a legal and commercial term covering many different minerals, but the following are considered to be asbestos. Read on to learn more.

Chrysotile

Chrysotile is the most common asbestos. Found in walls, roofs, ceilings as well as floors. It also has applications is the automobile industry for boiler seats, gaskets, brake linings and insulation for appliances, ducts, and pipes.

Amosite

Amosite was used in pipe insulation and sheets of cement and can also be discovered in ceiling tiles, thermal insulation products, and insulating board.

Crocidolite

This was often used in the insulation of steam engines as well as plastics, pipe insulation, cement products, and spray-on coatings.

Anthophyllite

Anthophyllite was used for construction and insulation products. It also appears in chrysolite asbestos, talc, and vermiculite.

All Asbestos Dangerous?

All identified forms of asbestos can cause cancers, mesothelioma as well as other significant and serious diseases. he Health Protection Agency in the U.K., claim amphibole varieties of asbestos are the most dangerous forms. Meanwhile, The EPA has abandoned projects aiming to identify which asbestos fiber types are the most toxic.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Kitchens

Asbestos In Kitchens

When you are renovating your kitchen you should be aware of serious health and safety concerns as you may be exposed to asbestos and this can cause harm to yourself as well as those living in the same house as you. This is why you need to test materials for asbestos.

Look at the following areas prior to the outset of the renovation.

  • Splash-backs – the glue used for the splash-back and/or the tile may contain asbestos.
  • Kitchen Tiles –9″ vinyl or asphalt-based floor tiles, 12” vinyl tiles and sheet linoleum made prior to 1990.
  • Kitchen Tile Adhesive – the glue used for kitchen flooring materials.
  • Hot water insulation – asbestos coatings used to insulate hot water.
  • Ducting – moving or replacing ducting work – check for tape at the joints as some may contain asbestos.
  • Drywall – you’ll need to have the drywall tested before disposal or removal as it may contain asbestos
  • Ceramic Tile – Underlay sheeting for ceramic tiles may contain asbestos.
  • Ceilings – including drop ceiling, popcorn ceiling, and plaster may contain asbestos.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos In Auto Repair, Brakes And Clutches

Asbestos In Auto Repair Brakes And Clutches.

Asbestos has been a component in linings, clutch facings, and brakes pads for a long time and millions of them on the shelf of an auto parts store or operating in vehicles can still be found today. That said they are not normally used in the production of new components. Read on to learn more.

Hazards

As clutches and brakes wear down through regular usage, dust containing asbestos is released into the outside environment as well as getting trapped within the vehicle housing to be released when those areas are being worked on. Asbestos dust is also spread further by using a vacuum cleaner to sweep up the break residue and in a similar way to use compressed air.

Therefore, it should be obvious that mechanics are at high risk for asbestos exposure. Cleaning drum brakes can release asbestos fibers by the million around the face of a mechanic, even striking a brake drum with an object like a hammer can cause the release of asbestos fibers.  It can get on their hands and be swallowed as well. Asbestos lingers once it is in the air and can be inhaled by customers as well as mechanics. Not to mention the dust will remain on their clothes, endangering other people they may meet.

Minimizing Dangers

Government regulations state any shop that does in excess of five brake jobs per year must use special equipment so asbestos exposure is minimized. These include a see-through enclosure surrounding the brake system and a vacuum with a HEPA filter. Another method is low-pressure sprays used to wet down the brake assembly and the water runoff when collected. Asbestos must also be collected and sealed as well as labeled in containers that cannot be opened.

The Home Mechanic

As home auto mechanics are still a very popular pastime those who work with clutches and brakes containing asbestos are also at risk and the problem may even be more intense as they do not often have the safety equipment found in auto shops.

The SPA states at home mechanics should refrain from using compressed air to clean brakes to prevent the release of asbestos and should also use parts that are preground to avoid asbestos exposure.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Asbestos And Commercial Buildings

Is Asbestos In Your Walls

Originally workers involved in maritime work, manufacturing and building trades were exposed to the effects of asbestos. The effects of these included mesothelioma, lung cancer, and asbestosis. However, exposure to asbestos in the above areas is very different than the exposure for the potential for people who occupy commercial buildings with asbestos-containing building materials, known as ACBM’s – these can be defined as buildings that contain asbestos at a rate of greater than one percent.

ACBM’s needed to be managed properly and this meant the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) has to establish and specify work practices so asbestos release would be minimized when demolition and renovation activities take place. This means there are various rules and practices that have to be followed under what is known as the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations – and these must be strictly adhered too.

ACBM’s can be managed in place by drafting and implementing an Asbestos Operations and Maintenance Plan (O&M Plan), which identifies the type, location as well as the condition of all ACBM’s.

This plan needs to be available for review by everyone involved in the maintenance and renovation of a building. by sticking to this plan, it will prevent exposure to asbestos and also ensure any activities are performed in a way that minimizes the potential health hazards.

The costs to do this varies a great deal. On the low end, it can be less than $2,000 – that said it is only part of the cost with ACBM’s. When asbestos fibers re-identified – here are a few ideas of what the cost should be for the removal of ACBM’s.

  • Sprayed on structural steel insulation and spray-on ceiling texture ranges from $25-40/square foot
  • Pipe insulation or ductwork insulation-$10-15/linear foot 
  • Floor tile and mastic (glue which adheres the floor tile to base floor) is usually $3.00-$5.00/square foot

These costs do not include:

  • The design for asbestos abatement from licensed asbestos designed professional
  • Pre-bid meetings with an abatement contractor obtaining competitive asbestos abatement pricing
  • Third-party air monitoring when the abatement activities are underway by an air monitor who is asbestos accredited
  • An inspection post-abatement taking air samples prior to the re-occupancy of the building

Undoubtedly, all of these should be performed by competent, experienced and accredited consultants. Note that some states prohibit those who monitor the air from directly working with the abatement contractor to prevent any conflicts of interest.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

How Much Does Asbestos Siding Removal Cost?

How Much Does Asbestos Siding Removal Cost?

The average price to remove asbestos siding is around $1,000, with typical costs between $800 and $1,200.

The average price to repair asbestos siding is around $4,761, with typical costs between $665 and $8,856. Many projects come as low as $300 while some may reach $22,500. Encapsulation, a favorable type of repair, averages about $2 to $6 per sq. ft.

Asbestos is a highly dangerous material. A lot of homes built prior to 1989 has asbestos siding. While health and safety should be of concern, fully removing them may not be required. Toxic particles will stay where they are, and the exterior will be safe to be near if it is complete and uncut. Nevertheless, it is highly suggested that you encapsulate to be sure that no fibers escape.

If your siding tests positive for asbestos, get a hold of an asbestos abatement expert. They can assist you in determining what courses of action are needed and if you should replace or encapsulate.

National Average

$4,761

Typical Range

$665 – $8,856

Low End – High End

$300 – $22,500

Asbestos Siding Removal Costs Per Sq. Ft & Per Hour

The price of asbestos siding removal is about $8 per sq. ft. The complete price includes hourly labor from an abatement expert. Knowledgeable contractors bill about $200 per hour. Because it takes around 1 hour for the removal of 25 sq. ft, average removal costs around $800 to $1,200 for 100 sq. ft.

Cost to Remove Asbestos Shingles

The price of removing asbestos shingle siding is about $200 per hour or $8 per sq. ft. In contrast, it costs between $20 to $120 per sq. ft for the removal of roofing shingles. The price will differ because steeper roofs are harder to work on than a flat roof.

In each project, the contractor will have to painstakingly pry off the shingles one at a time instead of removing complete panels. This can be favorable for you if there is a small area of shingles or can grow into a comprehensive project for homes enclosed in asbestos.

Type of Asbestos Found

Chrysotile is accountable for 95 percent of the asbestos that is used in buildings in the United States. The kind of fibers you discover should not affect the removal cost, particularly because you only have a 5 percent chance of finding anything apart from chrysotile.

  • Crocidolite- This is part of the Amphibole family and has needle-shaped, blue fibers.
  • Amosite- This is also part of the Amphibole family and has needle-shaped, brown fibers.
  • Chrysotile– This is part of the Serpentine family and has curly, white fibers.

Material Siding Types

The kind of material you have will determine the cost of its removal. If the home’s siding was installed before 1989, chances are high that it includes asbestos.

  • Cement: If it’s in the form of lap or shingles, it is more probable to discharge fibers if it falls apart from wear and tear, is broken or cut.
  • Brick: There is really no concern. Asbestos cement adhesive bonds bricks, it is rigid and has a less chance of discharging fibers into the air.

Any material on houses built following 1989 is more unlikely to contain asbestos, and if it does, it only may contain 1 percent of it pursuant to international guidelines. You may decide on fiber cement, vinyl, wood, brick, and other compound materials without concern of installing hazardous elements.

Cost to Dispose of Asbestos Siding

The total removal price includes disposal. Local and federal regulations dictate that an approved center must dispose of asbestos, so only professionals should take on this job. It is illegal to include impurities in your weekly trash pickup.

Collecting asbestos needs the right safety equipment. Experts will utilize masks, protective eyewear, footwear, suits, and gloves to guarantee to not getting into contact with asbestos. They also utilize a specialized HEPA vacuum to get rid of any hazardous particles from the air that may be as tiny as 0.5 microns. They then contain the asbestos and take them safely to a dedicated landfill.

Asbestos Siding Encapsulation Costs

The cost for asbestos siding encapsulating is $2 to $6 per sq. ft. For 1,500 sq. ft, it can cost from $3,000 to $9,000. Encapsulating is a more inexpensive option for full replacement.

An expert will painstakingly paint your siding using a latex masonry primer and high-grade latex paint. Encapsulation will prevent fibers from being released into the air.

Do It Yourself vs. Hiring an Expert

Hiring an asbestos removal professional safeguards you from breaching the strict local and federal guidelines. Because of this, hiring a professional is worth the additional cost. Doing the project by yourself could get you in legal trouble if you do not stick to your locale’s demo and removal responsibilities. Additionally, if you do not have the proper tools and equipment to do the job in a safe matter, you may accidentally breathe in the fibers. It doesn’t matter which method you choose, find a knowledgeable and dependable professional who will be able to assist you with the legal guidelines for the project.

Source:

Learn How Much It Costs to Repair Asbestos Siding.” HomeAdvisor, https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/siding/repair-asbestos-siding/.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Secondary Asbestos Exposure

Secondary Asbestos Exposure

It sounds like something from an Orwellian nightmare but it may be possible that thanks to secondary asbestos exposure every time kissed or hugged a loved one you are inadvertently exposing them to a toxin so deadly, the US Government classifies it as a Group One carcinogen.

Although decades have passed since asbestos was used in construction, asbestos dust is still causing dreaded cancer, mesothelioma, today.

A National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) report from over twenty years ago stated exposure to asbestos in a domestic setting still poses an increased risk of diseases. Women, in their traditional household role, have been exposed to asbestos dust for decades and suffering from mesothelioma, essentially a death sentence from breathing in the dust from their family’s work clothing. Dust was also shared from skin to skin contact and from hair as well as from laundering the clothes in washing machines.

If that is not bad enough just because a partner showed their affection you may have developed mesothelioma. Truly one of the most tragic ways one can be exposed to this deadly mineral.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Is Asbestos In Your Walls?

Is Asbestos In Your Walls

Right until the end of the 1970’s asbestos was a common component in the manufacturing of drywall in the United States. So, if you are planning on some demolition work, remember if the building you are working on was built prior to 1980, it may well contain asbestos. Asbestos exposure may cause scarring of the tissue in your lungs and abdomen and cause difficulty berating as well as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Mesothelioma is an especially cruel and painful kind of cancer with no cure. Read on to learn more.

Paneling And Drywall

If your building was built after 1930 here is a fair chance part of it is made from drywall. Although it was not common for these to contain asbestos fiber, the heavier duty cement boards used often did as well as paneling designed for decorative purposes. As a rule of thumbs, panels containing asbestos are not usually harm causing so long as they are still in one solid piece with no breaks or fractures.

When replacing vintage paneling that may contain asbestos, remove it in one piece. Do not break it up as this will expose you to asbestos. Remember as the boards age they become increasingly brittle and their removal may cause very small asbestos fibers to go across the room where they can be ingested and breathed in. However, you can cover the older wall panels with another treatment to the surface – this will be ok as long as you no longer drill through to the wall covering.

Joint Compounds

Regardless of whether there is asbestos in the drywall of your home, wall-joint compound, also commonly known as sheetrock mud manufactured for forty years from 1940 onwards did contain asbestos. It was utilized to fuse the seams between the panels of drywall once they were installed.

Remarkably this was commonly sold in hardware stores either as a paste in a can or bucket or as a dry pounder with a five pound or twenty-five pound sack. Obviously using this exposed people to asbestos and must be treated with great caution now.

 

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Worrying about Asbestos In Your Home?

Worrying about Asbestos In Your Home?

Widely used for nearly the entire twentieth century, asbestos is now banned in excess of fifty countries. So, should you be concerned if it is discovered in your home?

In The Home

You can often find asbestos in the duct system of older homes. Especially when a white-colored tape has been used. Other areas you may find it include. patching compounds, textured paint, embers in gas-powered fireplaces, ashes that are artificial, siding, roofing, walla and attics containing vermiculite insulation and tiles for floors and ceilings.

Health Problems

Mesothelioma, lung cancer, and asbestosis are the results of inhaling asbestos into your lungs causing inflammation and tumors. Asbestosis is characterized by inflammation, breath shortness, and coughing, mesothelioma is a kind of cancer of the membrane around the lungs while lung cancer is well known because so many die from it every year. as per the World health organization, in excess of 100,000 people die from these diseases per annum and many others die from diseases that are asbestos-related or suffer varying levels of disability and a decrease in their quality of life as a result.

What Risk Do You Have?

Many, perhaps most homes built before 1980 contain asbestos. However, those who suffer from asbestos-related conditions usually fall into one of the following:

  • Asbestos mine, mill, or transportation workers
  • Asbestos product workers
  • Families of asbestos workers
  • People who live near asbestos mines or mills

When there is Asbestos In Your Home?

If you see white tapes on your ducts it should be fine as long as it is not tampered with and likewise for vermiculite insulation in your attic. Remember you can always call an asbestos inspection company to test the material and decide what to do next from there.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost

Cost of Asbestos Removal Popcorn Ceiling

How much does it cost to remove a popcorn ceiling? You can expect to pay about $4 per sq. ft. on average or $1 to $3 per sq. ft. for popcorn ceiling removal that may or may not contain asbestos.

According to ImproveNet, popcorn ceiling removal costs about $1.50 per sq. ft. with average prices ranging from $1 to $2 per sq. ft. to remove a popcorn ceiling not containing asbestos in the US for 2019. Most homeowners spent around $1,565.  Homeguide states a similar prices range with “most home spending an average range of $2,700 for a 1,800 sq. ft. home” and average prices ranging from $1,010 to $2,260. You can expect to pay even more for the cost of asbestos popcorn ceiling removal.

Cost of Asbestos Removal Popcorn Ceiling

How much does it cost to remove asbestos from a popcorn ceiling? If your popcorn ceiling tests positive for asbestos, you can contain or encapsulate the asbestos for a cost of $2 to $6 per sq. ft. or hire an asbestos removal contractor to remove asbestos for about $10 to $20 per sq. ft. according to HomeGuide. On average, asbestos removal from a popcorn ceiling costs about $2,000, with prices ranging from $1,500 to $2,500 in the US for 2019.

Popcorn Ceiling vs Asbestos Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost

CostHelper says Popcorn ceilings not containing asbestos can expect to pay about $1 to $3 per square foot or $250 to $900 to remove a popcorn ceiling from a 15’x20’ room or $1,200 to $1,400 for a 1,6000 sq. ft house.

Popcorn ceiling containing asbestos can expect to pay about $3 to $7 per square foot $900 to $2,100 to remove a popcorn ceiling from a 15’x20’ room or $4,500 to $11,500 for a 1,6000 sq. ft house.

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost Factors

Learn more about the cost factors that affect popcorn ceiling removal.

Asbestos Testing. A simple asbestos test will cost you anywhere from $50 to $100.

Ceiling Size. The size of your ceiling makes a difference in the cost. Most asbestos removal contractors charge anywhere from $1 to $3 per sq. ft. or $15 to $40 per hour according to HomeAdvisor.

Moving Furniture. Furniture will need to be moved in order to remove the popcorn ceiling. Furniture removal usually only adds about $100 or so to the overall cost.

Asbestos Removal. If asbestos is found in your popcorn ceiling it will cost more to remove.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements

OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements 2

According to EPA.gov, OSHA now requires employers to establish and continue participation in an asbestos training program for employees that might be exposed to fiber levels that are either anticipated or measured at/above permissible exposure limits. OSHA training programs consist of initial classroom training and annual online refresher courses.

Permissible exposure limits are 0.1 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc) as an 8-hour, time-weighted average (TWA) and/or the excursion limit of 1.0 f/cc as a 30-minute time-weighted average (TWA).

See the full list of OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements (PDF)

See the full list of EPA AHERA Requirements (PDF)

Find your Local & State Asbestos Training Requirements

Employee Information & Training Requirements

According to OSHA Training Requirements,

  1. The employer must train every employee who will be exposed to airborne asbestos concentrations at/or above the PEL and/or excursion limit. The employer must establish and continue an on-going asbestos training program and ensure employee participation in the program.
  2. Training must be provided at the time/prior to the initial assignment and one time per year thereafter.
  3. The training program must be conducted in a way in which the employee is easily able to understand.
  4. The employer must also provide asbestos awareness training courses to employees who perform housekeeping work in an area that contains PACM or ACM. The asbestos awareness training course must contain the following elements: locations of PACM and ACM in the facility/building, health effects of asbestos, requirements relating to housekeeping, recognition of PACM and ACM damage and deterioration, and proper response to fiber release episodes, to all employees who perform housekeeping work in areas where PACM and/or ACM is present. Each such employee must be so trained at least one time per year.
  5. Employer must provide information and training materials
  6. Employer must keep records of training for up to one year after the employee’s last of employment.

Types of OSHA Asbestos Training

There are 3 types of OSHA Asbestos Training including:

  1. Awareness Training
  2. Special O&M Training
  3. Abatement Worker Training

Who Can Give OSHA Asbestos Training?

The (APM) asbestos program manager could conduct asbestos training programs for types one and two if they have specific asbestos training and knowledge. If not the APM then the builder owner must send workers or hire an outside consultant to teach the O&M training course. A trained and accredited asbestos professional or a trained industrial hygienist must conduct respirator use and fit-test training. Training on health effects must be conducted by a health professional. Type three training can only be conducted by an entity who’s training course(s) are approved by a state with an EPA approved MAP or by the EPA.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

How Much Does Asbestos Removal Cost?

How Much Does Asbestos Removal Cost?

On average, asbestos removal costs about $1,895. Asbestos removal prices ranged from $1,093 to $2,717 in the US for 2019. Whole-home asbestos removal costs can range anywhere from $15,000 to $30,000 depending on setup.

Cost of Asbestos Inspection

A preliminary asbestos inspection costs $400 to $800. The follow-up inspection when the project is completed adds anywhere from $200 to $400 according to HouseLogic. To get lab work done, a sample sent for testing averages from $25 to $75.

Average Asbestos Removal Costs

Asbestos removal cost varies depending on how extensive the work that needs to be done is. A lot of contractors have a minimum fee of $1,500 to $3,000, even if the project is small.

Complete removal in a 1,500-square-foot house with asbestos in the walls, ceilings, roof, floors, attic, pipes, and basement— costs could reach as high as $20,000 to $30,000. Sealing the area with asbestos is the most expensive responsible for nearly 65% of the total bill.

Asbestos is a carcinogen that was used abundantly in building materials before the 1970s. It’s typically found as pipe and duct insulation, wall and ceiling acoustical tiles, vermiculite attic insulation, floor tiles (and their adhesives), cement asbestos siding.

Don’t let that scare you, though. If the asbestos-containing materials in your home are not damaged, you can leave them alone. It’s a lot more dangerous to disturb them, says the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In a lot of states, you are required to divulge the presence of any asbestos to potential buyers of your home.

Having said that, if you plan on doing remodeling that will disturb the materials, total removal of them is the best option.

  • Asbestos Ceiling Tile Removal Cost

Removal of ceiling tiles costs around $5 and $15 per square foot. Popcorn ceilings or acoustic ceilings with a specialty thick sealant for between $2 and $6 per square foot. If your ceiling comes back negative for asbestos, the removal of popcorn ceilings cost $1,600 on average.

  • Average Asbestos Cleanup Costs in Ducts

Licensed professionals will include the cost of cleaning ducts if they removed asbestos from the ductwork. Test and inspect the ducts prior to regular cleanings. Costs will vary depending on the shape, length, accessibility, and type of duct system you have.

  • Asbestos Flooring & Floor Tile Removal Cost

Average cost of removing asbestos from flooring is about $5 to $15 per square foot. Floor tiles and the mastic used to glue them down requires mechanical removal. Almost all tile remediation only requires you encapsulate it and then directly cover it with new flooring. Installing new flooring will cost from $1,500 to $4,500.

  • Asbestos Pipe Insulation & Wrap Removal

In addition to the setup fees of $2.50 to $10 per square foot, the removal of pipe wrap runs an additional $2 to $5 per linear foot. Difficult to access areas can increase the cost further.

Asbestos Removal Hourly Labor Cost

According to HomeAdvisor, “On average, you’ll pay $75 to $200 per hour for labor per crew member. It takes a two-person crew an average of 8 hours to complete a typical project with a cost of $1,200 to $3,200.

Asbestos Removal Costs Per Square Foot

Asbestos removal costs per square ft range from $10 to $20 per sq. ft. on average according to HomeGuide.

  • Ceiling Tile: $2 to $15 per sq. ft.
  • Floor Tile: $5 to $15 per sq. ft.
  • Pipe Insulation & Wrap Removal: $2 to $10 per sq. ft.
  • Roof: $20 to $120 per sq. ft.
  • Drywall or Wall: $2 to $6 per sq. ft.

Asbestos Removal Basics

It’s a two-step process. First, the material needs to be tested to guarantee it contains asbestos. If it does come back containing asbestos, have it removed professionally. Here’s what you will need to know:

Contact your state asbestos administrative department as well as your regional asbestos program as or your Occupational Safety and Health Administration regional office to find out more about your local regulations and requirements.

Find certified asbestos inspectors and contractors that are trained and licensed in safe asbestos testing and removal.

To stay away from a conflict of interests, have suspected materials tested by one company and removal or abatement completed by a different one.

Prepare yourself–in some cases, you and your family might have to relocate temporarily while the asbestos is being removed.

Hiring a Corrective-Action Contractor

It’s okay to hire flooring, roofing, and siding contractors that could be exempt from state asbestos removal licensing provisions, just as long as they’re trained in asbestos removal. The EPA offers recommendations on what to do if you hire a corrective-action contractor.

Before work starts, you will want a written contract that undeniably states all federal, state, and local guidelines that the contractor is required to follow, like the cleanup of your property and disposal of the asbestos.

When the job is finished, acquire written proof from the contractor that every procedure was followed correctly. Have a follow-up inspection from a licensed asbestos inspector.

Sources:

  1. Walker, Jan Soults. “Asbestos Removal: Caution and Costs.” HouseLogic, HouseLogic, 18 Sept. 2018, https://www.houselogic.com/organize-maintain/home-maintenance-tips/asbestos-removal/.
  2. Learn How Much It Costs to Remove Asbestos.” HomeAdvisor, https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/environmental-safety/remove-asbestos/.

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