How Much Does Asbestos Siding Removal Cost?

How Much Does Asbestos Siding Removal Cost?

The average price to remove asbestos siding is around $1,000, with typical costs between $800 and $1,200.

The average price to repair asbestos siding is around $4,761, with typical costs between $665 and $8,856. Many projects come as low as $300 while some may reach $22,500. Encapsulation, a favorable type of repair, averages about $2 to $6 per sq. ft.

Asbestos is a highly dangerous material. A lot of homes built prior to 1989 has asbestos siding. While health and safety should be of concern, fully removing them may not be required. Toxic particles will stay where they are, and the exterior will be safe to be near if it is complete and uncut. Nevertheless, it is highly suggested that you encapsulate to be sure that no fibers escape.

If your siding tests positive for asbestos, get a hold of an asbestos abatement expert. They can assist you in determining what courses of action are needed and if you should replace or encapsulate.

National Average

$4,761

Typical Range

$665 – $8,856

Low End – High End

$300 – $22,500

Asbestos Siding Removal Costs Per Sq. Ft & Per Hour

The price of asbestos siding removal is about $8 per sq. ft. The complete price includes hourly labor from an abatement expert. Knowledgeable contractors bill about $200 per hour. Because it takes around 1 hour for the removal of 25 sq. ft, average removal costs around $800 to $1,200 for 100 sq. ft.

Cost to Remove Asbestos Shingles

The price of removing asbestos shingle siding is about $200 per hour or $8 per sq. ft. In contrast, it costs between $20 to $120 per sq. ft for the removal of roofing shingles. The price will differ because steeper roofs are harder to work on than a flat roof.

In each project, the contractor will have to painstakingly pry off the shingles one at a time instead of removing complete panels. This can be favorable for you if there is a small area of shingles or can grow into a comprehensive project for homes enclosed in asbestos.

Type of Asbestos Found

Chrysotile is accountable for 95 percent of the asbestos that is used in buildings in the United States. The kind of fibers you discover should not affect the removal cost, particularly because you only have a 5 percent chance of finding anything apart from chrysotile.

  • Crocidolite- This is part of the Amphibole family and has needle-shaped, blue fibers.
  • Amosite- This is also part of the Amphibole family and has needle-shaped, brown fibers.
  • Chrysotile– This is part of the Serpentine family and has curly, white fibers.

Material Siding Types

The kind of material you have will determine the cost of its removal. If the home’s siding was installed before 1989, chances are high that it includes asbestos.

  • Cement: If it’s in the form of lap or shingles, it is more probable to discharge fibers if it falls apart from wear and tear, is broken or cut.
  • Brick: There is really no concern. Asbestos cement adhesive bonds bricks, it is rigid and has a less chance of discharging fibers into the air.

Any material on houses built following 1989 is more unlikely to contain asbestos, and if it does, it only may contain 1 percent of it pursuant to international guidelines. You may decide on fiber cement, vinyl, wood, brick, and other compound materials without concern of installing hazardous elements.

Cost to Dispose of Asbestos Siding

The total removal price includes disposal. Local and federal regulations dictate that an approved center must dispose of asbestos, so only professionals should take on this job. It is illegal to include impurities in your weekly trash pickup.

Collecting asbestos needs the right safety equipment. Experts will utilize masks, protective eyewear, footwear, suits, and gloves to guarantee to not getting into contact with asbestos. They also utilize a specialized HEPA vacuum to get rid of any hazardous particles from the air that may be as tiny as 0.5 microns. They then contain the asbestos and take them safely to a dedicated landfill.

Asbestos Siding Encapsulation Costs

The cost for asbestos siding encapsulating is $2 to $6 per sq. ft. For 1,500 sq. ft, it can cost from $3,000 to $9,000. Encapsulating is a more inexpensive option for full replacement.

An expert will painstakingly paint your siding using a latex masonry primer and high-grade latex paint. Encapsulation will prevent fibers from being released into the air.

Do It Yourself vs. Hiring an Expert

Hiring an asbestos removal professional safeguards you from breaching the strict local and federal guidelines. Because of this, hiring a professional is worth the additional cost. Doing the project by yourself could get you in legal trouble if you do not stick to your locale’s demo and removal responsibilities. Additionally, if you do not have the proper tools and equipment to do the job in a safe matter, you may accidentally breathe in the fibers. It doesn’t matter which method you choose, find a knowledgeable and dependable professional who will be able to assist you with the legal guidelines for the project.

Source:

Learn How Much It Costs to Repair Asbestos Siding.” HomeAdvisor, https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/siding/repair-asbestos-siding/.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

How Much Does Asbestos Testing Cost?

How Much Does Asbestos Testing Cost?

The average for asbestos testing is about $503, with a typical range around $223 and $815. It may cost as low as $85 or high as $2,000. Testing costs increase with the buildings size and how complex the project is.

From around the 1900’s to around the 1970’s, contractors utilized this natural silicate in homes for its insulating capabilities and durability. Despite that, when damaged and aged, it flakes and crumbles, which emits its fibers into the air. When people breathe in carcinogenic fibers, it can lead to mesothelioma or Pulmonary fibrosis. It’s essential to get a professional to test for the presence of asbestos to find out if your business or home requires asbestos abatement or removal.

The cost of an asbestos survey or inspection is around $200 to $800. This test establishes the presence of asbestos to warrant professional removal. The price includes:

  • Optical inspection for general risks.
  • Collecting samples from areas like the insulation, roof, and walls.
  • Lab testing the samples.
  • Producing reports on the results.

Lab Testing Cost

The inspection price includes the cost of a lab test. Throughout the inspection, a professional will take every appropriate sample and send the samples to a lab. As an example, one sample is a couple of scrapings off of a textured ceiling to see if it needs the removal of the popcorn ceiling.

Report Costs

The price of the inspection typically includes the cost of an asbestos report because the lab fees are usually a part of the bundle. Following an examination, a report will be created that will confirm or deny the existence of hazardous fibers. You will provide these reports to an abatement professional to show where asbestos is located in your home.

Air Testing Pricing

You can expect to pay an average of $500 to the air for asbestosSubject to the number of samples you require and the size of your home, costs range around $200 to $800. This is comparable to the price of an inside air quality test, which sometimes includes asbestos in a list of wanted impurities.

Type 2 Asbestos Surveys

Today’s professionals denote to type two asbestos surveys as an “asbestos management survey,” which will cost around $200 and $800. These management surveys are really an inspection that’s a mixture of the previous type one tests and type two tests. It tests all the required samples and establishes vulnerable materials.

In essence, identifying surveys by “type” are a thing of the past. A type two is now part of what we now call an inspection or a management survey.

Asbestos Assessment Costs during a Home Inspection

Asbestos assessment costs throughout a home inspection is around $200 to $800 if you hire a professional independently from a home inspector. Nevertheless, if you hire a home inspector that is asbestos-certified, they can add a lesser fee than the average cost of a home inspection, that is about $330. It’s essential to acknowledge that normal home inspectors don’t do demolition, that includes scraping and taking samples unless they get permission from the homeowner.

Source:

  1. Learn How Much It Costs to Test For Asbestos.” HomeAdvisor, https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/environmental-safety/test-or-remove-asbestos/.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost

Cost of Asbestos Removal Popcorn Ceiling

How much does it cost to remove a popcorn ceiling? You can expect to pay about $4 per sq. ft. on average or $1 to $3 per sq. ft. for popcorn ceiling removal that may or may not contain asbestos.

According to ImproveNet, popcorn ceiling removal costs about $1.50 per sq. ft. with average prices ranging from $1 to $2 per sq. ft. to remove a popcorn ceiling not containing asbestos in the US for 2019. Most homeowners spent around $1,565.  Homeguide states a similar prices range with “most home spending an average range of $2,700 for a 1,800 sq. ft. home” and average prices ranging from $1,010 to $2,260. You can expect to pay even more for the cost of asbestos popcorn ceiling removal.

Cost of Asbestos Removal Popcorn Ceiling

How much does it cost to remove asbestos from a popcorn ceiling? If your popcorn ceiling tests positive for asbestos, you can contain or encapsulate the asbestos for a cost of $2 to $6 per sq. ft. or hire an asbestos removal contractor to remove asbestos for about $10 to $20 per sq. ft. according to HomeGuide. On average, asbestos removal from a popcorn ceiling costs about $2,000, with prices ranging from $1,500 to $2,500 in the US for 2019.

Popcorn Ceiling vs Asbestos Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost

CostHelper says Popcorn ceilings not containing asbestos can expect to pay about $1 to $3 per square foot or $250 to $900 to remove a popcorn ceiling from a 15’x20’ room or $1,200 to $1,400 for a 1,6000 sq. ft house.

Popcorn ceiling containing asbestos can expect to pay about $3 to $7 per square foot $900 to $2,100 to remove a popcorn ceiling from a 15’x20’ room or $4,500 to $11,500 for a 1,6000 sq. ft house.

Popcorn Ceiling Removal Cost Factors

Learn more about the cost factors that affect popcorn ceiling removal.

Asbestos Testing. A simple asbestos test will cost you anywhere from $50 to $100.

Ceiling Size. The size of your ceiling makes a difference in the cost. Most asbestos removal contractors charge anywhere from $1 to $3 per sq. ft. or $15 to $40 per hour according to HomeAdvisor.

Moving Furniture. Furniture will need to be moved in order to remove the popcorn ceiling. Furniture removal usually only adds about $100 or so to the overall cost.

Asbestos Removal. If asbestos is found in your popcorn ceiling it will cost more to remove.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

How to Get Asbestos License and Certification for Asbestos Removal

Asbestos License

Become a Certified Asbestos Abatement Specialist.

In order to get your asbestos license, you will need to meet all prerequisites, take the training course(s), pass the final exam, and apply for the certification. Requirements include an application fee, a copy of the training course certificate, a picture of the candidate, and more.

About Asbestos Certification

Just about every state requires asbestos abatement specialists to get certified or acquire a license prior to doing abatement work. Some states, such as Kansas and Idaho, don’t issue certifications but require individuals to take a training course prior to working with asbestos.

Asbestos abatement certificates are usually offered for the following five disciplines:

  • Worker: Carries out various asbestos abatement tasks under the management of a certified supervisor.
  • Supervisor: Manages asbestos workers and guarantees the safe practice of abatement.
  • Project Manager: Create project plans for asbestos abatement jobs.
  • Inspector: Carries out inspections to determine the condition and presence and of asbestos materials.
  • Management Planner: Creates plans and makes suggestions regarding asbestos removal.

Each discipline has prerequisites that need to be met prior to applying for a certificate.

Project managers, inspectors, and management planners are required to have a high school diploma or degree in a few cases. The supervisor, project manager, management planner, and project designer disciplines all usually requires some experience. Individuals that have certain professional licenses, like engineers and architects, can be exempt from those requirements.

Getting Certified for Asbestos Removal

After the prerequisites have been met, certification candidates need to take the relevant training course for their discipline. Courses are managed by accredited 3rd parties and usually last for 2-5 days depending on the discipline. At the end of the course, candidates take an exam and need to score a minimum of 70% to pass.

Candidates may apply for an asbestos abatement certification after completing a training course and passing the exam. Application requirements differ by state and discipline, but some requirements include:

  • Application fee
  • A copy of the training course certificate
  • Picture of the candidate
  • Information on Employment
  • Education history
  • Any enforcement actions were taken against the certification candidate
  • Physical conducted by a physician in the last 12 months

Those with abatement projects in numerous states might need to acquire certification from each state that they plan to work in. Some states have mutual agreements to honor certificates issued in other states, but these agreements aren’t common.

Annual Renewal of Asbestos Certification

Abatement certificates expire each year. Asbestos specialists are required to take a yearly refresher course for their discipline and then apply for recertification to keep their certificate.

Individuals that fail to renew their certificate can face enforcement actions including certificate suspension or having their certificate revoked.

Click on a link below to view licensing information in your state.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements

OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements 2

According to EPA.gov, OSHA now requires employers to establish and continue participation in an asbestos training program for employees that might be exposed to fiber levels that are either anticipated or measured at/above permissible exposure limits. OSHA training programs consist of initial classroom training and annual online refresher courses.

Permissible exposure limits are 0.1 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc) as an 8-hour, time-weighted average (TWA) and/or the excursion limit of 1.0 f/cc as a 30-minute time-weighted average (TWA).

See the full list of OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements (PDF)

See the full list of EPA AHERA Requirements (PDF)

Find your Local & State Asbestos Training Requirements

Employee Information & Training Requirements

According to OSHA Training Requirements,

  1. The employer must train every employee who will be exposed to airborne asbestos concentrations at/or above the PEL and/or excursion limit. The employer must establish and continue an on-going asbestos training program and ensure employee participation in the program.
  2. Training must be provided at the time/prior to the initial assignment and one time per year thereafter.
  3. The training program must be conducted in a way in which the employee is easily able to understand.
  4. The employer must also provide asbestos awareness training courses to employees who perform housekeeping work in an area that contains PACM or ACM. The asbestos awareness training course must contain the following elements: locations of PACM and ACM in the facility/building, health effects of asbestos, requirements relating to housekeeping, recognition of PACM and ACM damage and deterioration, and proper response to fiber release episodes, to all employees who perform housekeeping work in areas where PACM and/or ACM is present. Each such employee must be so trained at least one time per year.
  5. Employer must provide information and training materials
  6. Employer must keep records of training for up to one year after the employee’s last of employment.

Types of OSHA Asbestos Training

There are 3 types of OSHA Asbestos Training including:

  1. Awareness Training
  2. Special O&M Training
  3. Abatement Worker Training

Who Can Give OSHA Asbestos Training?

The (APM) asbestos program manager could conduct asbestos training programs for types one and two if they have specific asbestos training and knowledge. If not the APM then the builder owner must send workers or hire an outside consultant to teach the O&M training course. A trained and accredited asbestos professional or a trained industrial hygienist must conduct respirator use and fit-test training. Training on health effects must be conducted by a health professional. Type three training can only be conducted by an entity who’s training course(s) are approved by a state with an EPA approved MAP or by the EPA.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training Via Classroom & Online

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars

Disclaimer

The Asbestos Institute is not the official authority to determine OSHA training requirements, which are set forth in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA regulations are always being revised, added, and/or deleted, so you must not rely on The Asbestos Institute as the official authority of OSHA asbestos training requirements. Visit the official OSHA Asbestos Training Requirements page here.

What does AHERA stand for? Meaning & Definition

What Does AHERA Stand For

AHERA stands for “Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act”.

What is the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act?

The Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) and its regulations call for public school districts and non-profit schools as well as charter schools and those associated with religious institutions to:

  • Inspect their schools for asbestos-containing building materials
  • Prepare a management plan and to take necessary steps to prevent or decrease asbestos hazards

These legal requirements are based on the principle of “in-place” management of asbestos-containing building materials. The removal of these materials is not typically necessary unless the material is seriously damaged or will be disrupted by a renovation project or building demolition.

The staff that are working on asbestos in schools are required to be trained and accredited in accordance with The Asbestos Model Accreditation Plan.

Additionally, if removal of asbestos during a renovation is justified, or school building demolition, public schools, and non-profit schools are required to comply with the Asbestos National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP).

AHERA Definition of School Buildings That Must Be Inspected

The Federal Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) requires every public and non-public elementary and secondary schools (K-12) to complete a preliminary inspection for asbestos and a reinspection of assumed and known asbestos at a minimum of once every 3 years in each building that is leased, owned, or otherwise used as a school building.

In the State Education Department “1995 Triennial Asbestos Reporting Forms” that were sent to every school, the first question asks: Is this building still used as a school? While this seems pretty straightforward, the AHERA definition of a school building needs to be referenced.

AHERA Section 763.83 defines the following as school buildings:

  1. any suitable structure that can be used as a classroom, including a school facility like as a laboratory, library, school lunchroom, or facility used for food preparation;
  2. any gym or other facility that is specifically designed for athletic and recreational activities for an academic class in physical education; or
  3. any other facility used for student instruction or housing or for the management of research or educational programs; and
  4. any storage, utility, or maintenance facility, including hallways, necessary to the operation of any facility defined in (a), (b), and (c).

Review the above definitions thoroughly. Any building that meets the above definition of a school building is covered by AHERA and is required to be inspected for asbestos. If any asbestos-containing building material (ACBM) is found throughout the initial inspection, these buildings are required to be re-inspected every 3 years for asbestos. The 1995 AHERA 3-year reinspection needs to be completed no later than July 9, 1995.

Asbestos, OSHA & AHERA Training

The Asbestos Institute has provided EPA and Cal/OSHA-accredited safety training since 1988. From OSHA 10 to hazmat training and asbestos certification, our trusted and experienced instructors make sure participants get the high-quality initial and refresher training they need.

Classroom

We train on-site at our headquarters in Phoenix, AZ or at our clients’ sites across the U.S. We offer both English and Spanish courses. Browse Classroom Classes

Online

Online courses allow you to align your learning with your personal schedule. This is a great option for students with family and work commitments. Browse Online Classes

Webinar

Live webinars allow you to watch instructors on demand from the comfort of your home or office. Learn, chat with other students, and ask questions in real-time. Browse Live Webinars